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USS Los Angeles CA-135 - History

USS Los Angeles CA-135 - History


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USS Los Angeles CA-135

Los Angeles II
(CA-135: dp. 13,600; 1. 674'11"; b. 70'10"; dr. 20'6";
s. 33 k., cpl. 1,142; a. 9 8", 12 5", 48 40mm., 28 20mm.;
cl. Baltimore)

The third Los Angeles (CA-135) was laid down by the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa., 28 July 1943; launched 20 August 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Fletcher Bowron, and commissioned 22 July 1945, Capt. John A. Snackenberg in command.

After shakedown out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Lox Angeles sailed 15 October for the Far East via the west coast and arrived Shanghai, China, 3 January 1946. During the next year she operated with the 7th Fleet along the coast of' China and in the western Pacific to the Marianas She returned to San Francisco, Calif., 21 January 1947; decommissioned at Hunters's Point 9 April 1948; and entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet.

Los Angeles recommissioned 27 January 1951, Capt. Robert N. McFarlane in command. In response to the American effort to thwart Communist aggression in the Republic of South, Korea, she sailed for the Far East 14 May and joined( naval operations off the eastern coast of Korea 31 May as flagship for Rear Adm. Arleigh A. Burke's CRUDIV 'i. During the next 6 months she ranged the coastal waters of the Korean Peninsula from Hungnam in the east of Haeju in the west while her guns pounded enemy coastal positions. After returning to the United States 17 December for overhaul and training, she made her second deployment to Korean waters 9 October 1952 and participated,.ed 11 October in a concentrated shelling of enemy bunl~ers and observation points at KoJi-ni. During the next few months, she continued to provide offshore gunfire support for American ground operations, and in addition she cruised the Sea of Japan with fast carriers of the 7th Fleet. While participating in the bombardment of Wonsan late in March and early in April 1953, she received minor damage from enemy shore batteries, but continued operations until sailing for the west coast in mid-April. She arrived Long Beach 15 May.

Between November 1953 and June 1963 Los Angeles made eight more deployments to the Far East where she served as a cruiser division flagship with the 7th Fleet in support of "keeping the peace" operations in that troubled part of th~ world. Her operations sent her from the coast of Japan to the Sea of Japan, the Yellow Sea, and the East and South China Seas, and with units of the mighty 7th Fleet she steamed to American bases in the Philippines and Okinawa, as well as to Allied bases in South Korea, Hong Kong, Australia, and Formosa. During the Quemoy-Matsu crisis in 1956, she patrolled the Formosa Strait to help protect Formosa from possible invasion from Communist China.

When not deployed in the western Pacific, Lo& Angeles& operated out of Long Beach along the west coast and in the Pacific to the Hawaiian Islands. She returned to Long Beach from her final Far East deployment 20 June 1963. She decommissioned at Long Beach 15 November 1963 and entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet at San Diego, where she remains into 1969.

Los Angeles received five battle stars for service during the Korean conflict.


USS Los Angeles CA-135 - History

Los Angeles II
(CA-135: dp. 13,600 1. 674'11" b. 70'10" dr. 20'6"
s. 33 k., cpl. 1,142 a. 9 8", 12 5", 48 40mm., 28 20mm.
cl. Baltimore)

The third Los Angeles (CA-135) was laid down by the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa., 28 July 1943 launched 20 August 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Fletcher Bowron, and commissioned 22 July 1945, Capt. John A. Snackenberg in command.

After shakedown out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Lox Angeles sailed 15 October for the Far East via the west coast and arrived Shanghai, China, 3 January 1946. During the next year she operated with the 7th Fleet along the coast of' China and in the western Pacific to the Marianas She returned to San Francisco, Calif., 21 January 1947 decommissioned at Hunters's Point 9 April 1948 and entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet.

Los Angeles recommissioned 27 January 1951, Capt. Robert N. McFarlane in command. In response to the American effort to thwart Communist aggression in the Republic of South, Korea, she sailed for the Far East 14 May and joined( naval operations off the eastern coast of Korea 31 May as flagship for Rear Adm. Arleigh A. Burke's CRUDIV 'i. During the next 6 months she ranged the coastal waters of the Korean Peninsula from Hungnam in the east of Haeju in the west while her guns pounded enemy coastal positions. After returning to the United States 17 December for overhaul and training, she made her second deployment to Korean waters 9 October 1952 and participated,.ed 11 October in a concentrated shelling of enemy bunl

ers and observation points at KoJi-ni. During the next few months, she continued to provide offshore gunfire support for American ground operations, and in addition she cruised the Sea of Japan with fast carriers of the 7th Fleet. While participating in the bombardment of Wonsan late in March and early in April 1953, she received minor damage from enemy shore batteries, but continued operations until sailing for the west coast in mid-April. She arrived Long Beach 15 May.

Between November 1953 and June 1963 Los Angeles made eight more deployments to the Far East where she served as a cruiser division flagship with the 7th Fleet in support of "keeping the peace" operations in that troubled part of th

world. Her operations sent her from the coast of Japan to the Sea of Japan, the Yellow Sea, and the East and South China Seas, and with units of the mighty 7th Fleet she steamed to American bases in the Philippines and Okinawa, as well as to Allied bases in South Korea, Hong Kong, Australia, and Formosa. During the Quemoy-Matsu crisis in 1956, she patrolled the Formosa Strait to help protect Formosa from possible invasion from Communist China.

When not deployed in the western Pacific, Lo& Angeles& operated out of Long Beach along the west coast and in the Pacific to the Hawaiian Islands. She returned to Long Beach from her final Far East deployment 20 June 1963. She decommissioned at Long Beach 15 November 1963 and entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet at San Diego, where she remains into 1969.

Los Angeles received five battle stars for service during the Korean conflict.


USS Los Angeles CA-135 - History

Los Angeles Maritime Museum

DECLARED
HISTORIC-CULTURAL MONUMENT NO. 146
BY THE
CULTURAL HERITAGE COMMISSION
CULTURAL AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT
CITY OF LOS ANGELES

The USS LOS ANGELES was a United States Navy heavy cruiser ("CA"), number 135, commissioned in 1945 and financed through the sale of war bonds purchased by the people of Los Angeles. The USS LOS ANGELES was the third Navy ship to be named after the city, and held special symbolism for the public and for the men who served aboard her. After operating with the 7th fleet off the coast of China, USS LOS ANGELES was decommissioned in 1948, but returned to service in 1951 to fight in the Korean War. As the flagship for then Rear Admiral Arleigh A. Burke, the USS LOS ANGELES received five battle stars for her Korean War service.

In 1975 she was sent to the scrap yard, but her story did not end. Officers, crew, and members of the community saved what they could from their ship. The monuments outside the museum and the artifacts in this exhibit are testiments to her career and to the dedication of those who preserve the history of the USS LOS ANGELES.

This exhibit was made possible through the generous support of the USS LOS ANGELES CA-135 Association.

Known as the "First and Finest", the LOS ANGELES is the lead ship of the largest submarine class (Los Angeles Class) in the Navy's arsenal, and the fourth US Navy vessel to bear the name LOS ANGELES.

Launched on April 6, 1974 at Newport News, Virginia, she was commissioned on November 13, 1976, and made her first operational deployment to the Mediterranean Sea in 1977. The following year, LOS ANGELES was transferred to the Pacific Fleet, where she made her first visit to the port of Los Angeles before being assigned to Submarine Squadron Seven in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

In July of 1992 LOS ANGELES arrived at her new home port at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California. At this time she was outfitted with a new sonar system, reactor core, and noise reducing equipment.

The LOS ANGELES completed an extensive 31-month overhaul in March of 1995. Reassigned to Pearl Harbor and attached to Submarine Squadron One, she now combines unmatched endurance and speed with the latest stealth technology. Her armament consists of heavyweight MK 48 torpedoes, Harpoon anti-ship missles, and all variants of the Tomahawk cruise missiles. With upgraded SEAL delivery capabilities, the LOS ANGELES continues to provide a 'forward presence' for the United States.

Three U.S. Ships have been named Long Beach. The first, AK-9, was a cargo ship commissioned on 20 December 1917. She was assigned to the U.S. Naval Force operating in Europe, transporting coal from England and Ireland to France for use by the U.S. Army. Following World War I, she continued operation as a transport until decommissioned on 26 April 1921 and sold to a private citizen for $20,000 on 24 May 1922.

The second, PF-34, was a patrol frigate launched on 5 May 1943 and commissioned on 8 September under the command of lieutenant Commander T. R. Midtlying, U. S. Coast Guard. The Long Beach participated in the landings on Manus in the Admiralties and in the invasion of Aitape. She also took part in numerous convoy escort missions and earned a total of four battle stars for World War II service. In June of 1945 the Long Beach was transferred to Alaska where she took part in a training exercise. In July 1945, she was decommissioned and trasferred to the Soviet Navy under the Lend-Lease Act. Returned to the United States on 17 October 1949 and lent to the Japanese government in November 1953, remaining there until she was scrapped in 1967.

The third, CGN-9, was a cruiser -- with the distinction of being the world's first nuclear-powered surface warship. Her keel was laid on 2 December 1957 by Bethlehem Steel Company in Quincy, Massachusetts. She was launched on 14 July 1959 and commissioned on 9 September 1961 under the command of Captain B. P. Wilkinson, U. S. Navy. The cruiser was home ported at Norfolk, Virginia. After many productive training exercises, the Long Beach with the carrier Enterprise (then CVAN-65) and the frigate Bainbridge (then DLGN-25) formed the first all nuclear-powered task group. These ships were assigned to Operation Sea Orbit, an around-the-world cruise that began in July of 1964 and lasted for 58 days.

Four years later, while on station in the Gulf of Tonkin, the Long Beach again made history by employing her Talos missle system to shoot down a North Vietnamese jet that was more than 70 miles away - the first time in U. S. history that a surface-to-air missle downed an enemy aircraft. By the end of U. S. involvement in Vietnam, the Long Beach was involved with downing nine enemy jets and rescuing 17 U. S. pilots.

The Long Beach was fitted with Tomahawk cruise missles in 1985 and later participated in the War on Drugs and supported UN sanctions against Iraq. Following several reprieves, the Long Beach was decommissioned on 2 July 1994.

Although Commissioned by the Navy, this World War II Patrol Frigate was manned by 215 officers and men of the United States Coast Guard.

Armed with three inch-50's, twin 40's, 20mm machine guns, depth charges, K-guns, and hedgehog, this vessel served in the South Pacific 7th Amphibious Force, Seventh Fleet, often referred to as "MacArthur's Navy".

SAN PEDRO earned 6 battle stars and credited with downing five enemy planes in actions along the North New Guinea Coast, invasion of Hollandia, Dutch New Guinea, shelled troop concentrations, supply dumps on Biak and Soepiori Island. Convoyed resupply and troops to New Britain, the Admiralties, Morotai and Palau. At Sansapor she was the first frigate to shoot down an enemy plane. During the epic of Leyte Gulf in the Philippines of October 1944, Coast Guardsmen stayed at their guns seventy-two hours shooting down some of the first Kamikaze planes seen in the war.

December 5, 1944 while escorting a convoy southeast of Leyte Gulf, the liberty ship ANTOINE SAUGRAINE carrying an entire army radar unit was torpedoed. While attempting rescue of men from the water and liferafts, the enemy bombers returned to attack. The courageous Coast Guard crews of the SAN PEDRO and a sister frigate fought them off, shooting down one plane and despite being under fire, completed the rescue of 413 men. On December 15, 1944 the SAN PEDRO departed Boston and was subsequently loaned to the Russian Navy. After the war the ship was transferred to the Japanese Coastal Security Force.

Her meritorious service at an end, the USS San Pedro ended ignominiously as a target ship.


Interview

Admiral Wertheim: In any case we installed Regulus on Los Angeles it was the first such installation, it was kind of a grafting of a capability onto a ship that was not designed for it—adding a guided missile with a nuclear warhead to a ship that wasn't designed for that purpose. It was kind of a new thing for all of us.

John T. Mason Jr.: She didn't have to go into a navy yard?

Admiral Wertheim: Yes she did. This was done in a yard availability but what I am saying is that such things as providing adequate security for the protection of nuclear weapons, meeting the requirements for the two-man rule and the like, and limited access. On a ship, in the hangar deck, which is where we kept the missile and its warhead, required us to do some things that were clearly expedients—locking doors, putting bolts on doors, stationing marine guards. The hangar deck on a heavy cruiser was not designed for limited access. It was designed for quite the opposite, for ready access. I remember the trauma of attempting to meet these security arrangements in the face of an irate first lieutenant who said, "By God, nobody is going to keep me out of any part of any ship, of any part of this ship. I and my damage control teams have to be able to get in to where we want." He armed himself with a set of bolt cutters and as fast as I would add padlocks he would snip them off. We had to have an understanding which we ultimately worked out. The installation was jury-rigged really.

John T. Mason Jr.: What about launchers? What kind did you have for the missile? This had to be installed also?

Admiral Wertheim: Yes, the launcher was also a jury-rigged arrangement, it was the same design launcher that had been used or was being used for launching from aircraft carriers—launching the Regulus from aircraft carriers, it was a rail launcher and the missile would be winched up into position on the launcher and then the launcher rails would be elevated by hydraulic mechanism the whole thing had been built by the Naval Aircraft Factory which no longer exists (in Philadelphia) and when the thing was elevated, the engine was cranked up as it had to be before launching. Visualize if you will, in your mind's eye, a small jet airplane up on rails that were elevated high into the air and pointing up on an angle of 35° or 40°, supported by two arms extended vertically and as the ship would roll this whole mechanism would sway back and forth, wave around in the breeze so to speak up there, with the jet engine whining and with the high ex­plosive in a nuclear warhead and jato bottles ready to be ignited—the whole thing was a disaster waiting for a place to happen.

An SSM-N-8 Regulus I missile is poised and ready to be launched aboard the USS Hancock (CV-19).

John T. Mason Jr.: Pretty vulnerable in a storm?

Admiral Wertheim: Not only vulnerable but it was probably more hazardous to us than it would have been to any enemy. That was the installation we had initially. Later we had that launcher arrangement replaced with one that was a much safer arrangement, one that had things under much better control, rails that allowed the missile to be moved from the hangar deck up to the launch deck and under positive control all the way. Nevertheless we actually made a de­ployment to the Far East with that missile and with live warheads and I guess, in a dire emergency, the government could have actually called upon us to launch it, God forbid!

John T. Mason Jr.: What was the range of the Regulus?

Admiral Wertheim: I believe it was about 500 miles but of course the control system from the ship would not have allowed it to control a missile for anything like that range. We had a radar that would allow us to control it basically to the line of sight, to a target within the line of sight. The principle means of controlling REGULUS however was with a chase plane, another aircraft that would fly along with it and control it and cause it to dial on its target, so in that particular role it really became just an auxiliary means of delivering a bomb. If you think of one airplane controlling the delivery of a weapon on a target it isn't terribly different from if that airplane had carried the bomb in the first place. This simply allowed it to be done remotely and from some distance away and therefore more safely and perhaps better able to penetrate.

John T. Mason Jr.: It was something in transition?

Admiral Wertheim: Yes, it was not by any means the invulnerable ultimate weapon that we later came to think of our ballistic missiles as being a delivery system that could not be intercepted but rather just another aircraft to carry the bomb.


USS Los Angeles (CA-135)

USS Los Angeles (CA-135) was a Baltimore class heavy cruiser that served on two tours of duty during the Korean War. Los Angeles received five battle stars for service during the Korean conflict.

The Los Angeles was laid down in July 1943, launched on 20 August 1944 and commissioned on 22 July 1945. The Second World War ended before her shakedown cruise was over, but once she was ready for service she was dispatched to the Far East. She joined the 7th Fleet in January 1946 and spent the rest of the year operating in the western Pacific. She then returned home where on 9 April 1948 she was decommissioned.

After the outbreak of the Korean War the US Navy needed more ships and the Los Angeles was recommissioned on 27 January 1951. Once again she was sent to the Pacific, and she arrived off the east coast of Korea on 31 May. She served as the flagship of CruDiv 5 (Rear Admiral Arleigh A. Burke). This first tour lasted for six months and involved her in the fighting on both the west and east coast of Korea.

Her second tour of Korea started on 9 October 1952 and she was in action on 11 October. In both tours she carried out shore bombardments. During the second tour she was also used as part of the screen for the 7th Fleet's fast carriers. In April 1954 she was hit by North Korean shore guns, but only suffered minor damage. This second tour ended in mid-April and she returned to the US in mid-May.

The Los Angeles split the remaining ten years of her active career between duties with the 7th Fleet in the Far East, carrying out eight peace-time tours, and with operations from Long Beach, California. The nearest she came to combat during this period was during the Quemoy-Matsu crisis of 1958 (also known as the Second Taiwan Strait Crisis). She was part of the US fleet that helped protect Taiwan against a possible invasion from mainland China.

The Los Angeles was decommissioned on 15 November 1963, five months after returning from the Pacific for the last time. She was struck off the Navy List on 1 January 1974.


The table below contains the names of sailors who served aboard the USS Los Angeles (CA 135). Please keep in mind that this list does only include records of people who submitted their information for publication on this website. If you also served aboard and you remember one of the people below you can click on the name to send an email to the respective sailor. Would you like to have such a crew list on your website?

Looking for US Navy memorabilia? Try the Ship's Store.

There are 49 crew members registered for the USS Los Angeles (CA 135).

Select the period (starting by the reporting year): precomm &ndash 1961 | 1962 &ndash now

NameRank/RatePeriodDivisionRemarks/Photo
Cleveland, Cleosn1962 &ndash 1963ship's service
Rodriguez, Richard RMSNApr 1962 &ndash Aug 30, 1963CRMy first ship, first and best of many WestPacs! Ships last cruise as we decommissioned her after returning to Long Beach, CA in June 1963!
Howard, Thomas (Doc)HM2May 15, 1962 &ndash Aug 15, 1963HI was not a proper sailor when I came aboard, but was pretty squared away when I left.
Lockwood, FrankSNJun 1962 &ndash 19633rdLooking to talk with former USS Los Angeles and Uss Frontier shipmates from 1962 and 1964, share memories etc.
Chesley, AndrusPFCJul 1962 &ndash Jul 1963MarDet
Wright, JesseLCPLSep 1, 1962 &ndash Jul 1, 1963MARDET/FLAG
Majersky, Nick Nov 11, 1962 &ndash Jul 10, 1963MAR DET
Evans, Ronald E3Feb 1963 &ndash Sep 19633rd This was my first ship after joining the Navy. I truly enjoyed my time on the deck force in 3rd Division. BM1 Hill was our LPO at the time and rode us hard. Holy Stoning the deck at 3 AM . Retired in 93 as MCPO(SW)

Select the period (starting by the reporting year): precomm &ndash 1961 | 1962 &ndash now


Contents

Los Angeles made her first operational deployment to the Mediterranean Sea in 1977 and was awarded a Meritorious Unit Citation. In 1978, she transferred to the Pacific Fleet and was assigned to Submarine Squadron 7, homeported in Pearl Harbor. She conducted 17 Pacific deployments over the next 32 years and earned eight Meritorious Unit Citations and a Navy Unit Citation. Los Angeles participated in four multinational "Rim of the Pacific" (RIMPAC) exercises, and visited numerous foreign ports in Italy, Republic of the Philippines, Diego Garcia, Hong Kong, Mauritius, Australia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Canada and Singapore. [2]

In 1999, Los Angeles was modified to carry a Dry Deck Shelter (DDS). Her capabilities included undersea warfare, surface warfare, strike warfare, mining operations, special forces delivery, reconnaissance, carrier battle group support and escort, and intelligence collection. [5]

Los Angeles was inactivated on 1 February 2010 and decommissioned 4 February 2011. The wardroom of the oldest submarine in the fleet carries Richard O'Kane's personal cribbage board, and upon her decommissioning the board was transferred to the next oldest boat at that time, USS Bremerton (SSN-698) . [6] [7] Ex-Los Angeles entered the Navy's Ship-Submarine Recycling Program, 1 February 2010, [8] and recycling was completed 30 November 2012. [1]


Decommissioning and sale [ edit | edit source ]

While some consideration was made to convert Los Angeles into a single-end Talos missile cruiser, with flagship facilities (in essence a heavy cruiser version of the Oklahoma City) funds were not appropriated for this, (or for a general overhaul to enable her continued fleet service), so she was decommissioned at Long Beach on 15 November 1963 and entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet at San Diego. Stricken on 1 January 1974, and sold on 16 May 1975 (sale #16-5049) to the National Steel Corporation for $1,864,380.21, and scrapped in San Pedro, California.

The flying bridge and a small portion of the bow section of the Los Angeles is on display at the Los Angeles Maritime Museum in San Pedro, CA.


USS Los Angeles CA-135 - History

USS Los Angeles (SSN 688), the fourth naval ship to be named after the City of Los Angeles, is the lead ship of her class. Designed as a follow-on to the Sturgeon - class submarines built during the 1960s, the Los Angeles- class incorporates improved sound quieting and a larger propulsion plant than previous classes.

Launched on April 6, 1974 at Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company in Newport News, Virginia, her sponsor was the Honorable Anne L. Armstrong, counselor to the President. USS Los Angeles was commissioned on November 13, 1976, Cmdr. John E. Christensen in command.

She made her first operational deployment to the Mediterranean Sea in 1977 and was awarded a Meritorious Unit Citation.

In 1978 SSN 688 was transferred to the Pacific Fleet and was assigned to Submarine Squadron Seven, homeported in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

In July 1992, the Los Angeles departed Naval Station Pearl Harbor for a homeport change to Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California. Arriving on August 6, she commenced the first Engineered Refueling Overhaul of a Los Angeles-class fast attack submarine. During the overhaul, she was outfitted with the latest state-of-the-art sonar and fire control systems, as well as the Navy&rsquos newest reactor controls equipment. These extensive upgrades make her one of the most advanced submarines in the submarine force.

USS Los Angeles returned to an operational status in March 1995, after the 31 month overhaul. She was re-assigned to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, attached to Submarine Squadron One.

August 11, 2003 SSN 688 returned to Naval Station Pearl Harbor after a six-month deployment in the western Pacific.

September 10, Cmdr. Thomas P. Stanley relieved Cmdr. Cristopher B. Thomas, as CO of USS Los Angeles, during the change of command ceremony abord the ship.

November 9, 2004 USS Los Angeles departed for a western Pacific deployment in support of the Global War on Terrorism.

March 30, 2005 The fast attack submarine pulled to Apra Harbor, Guam, for a routine port call.

May 6, SSN 688 returned to homeport after a six-month underway period.

November 20, 2006 USS Los Angeles, commanded by Cmdr. Erik Burian, held a ceremony to mark its 30th birthday on Nov. 13, on the pier at Naval Station Pearl Harbor. She is currently in preparation for the deployment next year.

November 30, Los Angeles is currently moored at the Southeast Alaska Acoustic Measurement Facility Static Site in Ketchikan, Alaska, as part of Escape Exercise 2006. She was the first nuclear-powered U.S. submarine to conduct an open ocean escape.

December 7, SSN 688 arrived into namesake port of Los Angeles for the first time.

May 8, 2007 USS Los Angeles departed Pearl Harbor for a scheduled western Pacific deployment.

October 24, The oldest attack submarine pulled to Yokosuka, Japan, for the final port visit before it returns to Pearl Harbor.

July 30, 2008 The Los Angeles returned to homeport after participating in Exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2008 off the Hawaiian coast.

October 20, 2009 USS Los Angeles, commanded by Cmdr. Steven Harrison, pulled to Apra Harbor, Guam, for a routine port visit.

November 19, SSN 688 returned to Naval Station Pearl Harbor from its last western Pacific deployment.

January 14, 2010 USS Los Angeles departed Pearl Harbor for her final voyage to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Wash., for inactivation.

January 20, The submarine arrived in Los Angeles Harbor for its last port visit. The arrival kicked-off the 14th annual Navy Days L.A. celebration.

January 23, USS Los Angeles held a decommissioning ceremony at San Pedro, Calif.

February 1, SSN 688 is inactivated and placed in Reserve (Stand Down) status.

February 4, 2011 USS Los Angeles is officially decommissioned, after more than 34 years of service, during a ceremony at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF).


KOREAN CONFLICT

VISIT US

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Battleship USS Iowa Museum
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Los Angeles (San Pedro), CA 90731
p: 877-446-9261
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Hours
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Watch the video: Roots of El Pueblo: The Beginning of Los Angeles (June 2022).


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