History Podcasts

Redfish SS-395 - History

Redfish SS-395 - History

Redfish I

(SS-395: dp. 1,526; 1.311'6"; b.27'3"; dr. 15'3", s. 20 k. (surf.)
8 k. (subm.); cpl. 66; a. 1 5", 1 20mm., 10 21" tt.; cl. Balao)

The first Redfish (SS-395) was laid down 9 September 1943 by Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N.H., launched 27 January 1944, sponsored by Miss Ruth Roper, and commissioned i2 April 1944, Comdr. Louis D. McGregor in command.

Redfish arrived at Pearl Harbor 27 June 1944. Departing 23 July, she sank the 5,953-ton Japanese cargo ship Batopaha Maru 25 August, the 7,311-ton tanker Oqura Maru No. 2 on 16 September, and the 8,506-ton transport Mia~lho Maru 21 September, all off Formosa, before arriving at Midway

2 October. Departing Midway on the 25th and Saipan on 3 November, she sank the 2,345-ton Japanese transport Hozan Maru during the night of 22-23 November. Departing Saipan 1 December, she combined with b'ea Devil the night of 8-9 to damage heavily the Japanese aircraft carrier Hayataka, putting that enemy ship out of action for the remainder of the war.

Redfish sank the newly built 18,500-ton Japanese aircraft carrier Unryu, bound for Mindoro, 19 December. After diving to 232 feet, she rose to the surface and raced to escape Japanese pursuit. Arriving at the Portsmouth Naval Shipvard for repairs 17 February 1945, she returned to Pearl Harbor 23 July, and remained there until the end of the war.

After duty at Guam from September 1945 to January 1946, she arrived at San Diego on the 30th. Departing 3 March 1947, she voyaged to Guam and Japan before returning 21 June After operations off the west coast and Hawaii, she sailed toward Korea 2 February 1951, and operated out of Yokosuka, Japan, until 24 June, in support of U.N. forces. Returning to San Diego 3 July, she operated off the west coast.

In the spring of 1954, she participated in the Walt Disney production of Jules Verne's "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea," and, in September 1957, in the motion picture "Run Silent, Run Deep."

Reclassified AGSS on 1 July 1960, she was underway from San Diego on western Pacific deployment from 26 March to 26 September. From then into 1968, she made ann',al training cruises to the western Paeific. Decommissioned 27 June 1968 at San Diego, she was struck from the Navy list 30 June, and sunk as a target.

Redfish received two battle stars for World War II service.


Redfish arrived at Pearl Harbor on 27 June 1944. Departing 23 July, she sank the 5,953-ton Japanese cargo ship Batopaha Maru on 25 August, the 7,311 ton tanker Ogura Maru Number Two on 16 September, and the 8,506 ton transport Mizuho Maru on 21 September, all off Formosa, before arriving at Midway Island on 2 October. Departing Midway on 25 October and Saipan on 3 November, she sank the 2,345 ton Japanese transport Hozan Maru during the night of 22 November – 23 November. Departing Saipan on 1 December, she combined with Sea Devil (SS-400) the night of 8 December – 9 December to heavily damage the Japanese aircraft carrier Junyō, putting that enemy ship out of action for the remainder of the war.

Japanese aircraft carrier Unryū, photographed through Redfish's periscope.

Redfish sank the newly built 18,500 ton Japanese aircraft carrier Unryū, bound for Mindoro, on 19 December. After diving to 232 feet (71 m), she rose to the surface and raced to escape Japanese pursuit. Arriving at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard for repairs on 17 February 1945, she returned to Pearl Harbor 23 July, and remained there until the end of the war.

Redfish received a Presidential Unit Citation which read "For extraordinary heroism in action during the First and Second War Patrols against enemy Japanese surface units in the restricted waters of the Pacific. Operating in bold defiance of foul weather and persistent hostile depth charging, gunfire and bombing by outnumbering forces of radar-equipped ships, air escorts and patrol craft, the U.S.S. REDFISH launched her accurate and intensive gun and torpedo fire during brief periods of concentrated attack to sink a new Japanese aircraft carrier with her entire complement of embarked planes and equipment destined to be used against our forces, to damage severely another vital carrier and to destroy or cripple much additional shipping necessary to the enemy’s continued prosecution of the war. Although forced to the bottom in 230 feet of water by vicious countermeasures, with her pressure hull cracked and numerous leaks throughout, the REDFISH responded gallantly to the superb handling of her skilled and aggressive ship's company and succeeded in evading further damage and returning to port. Her brilliant record of success in combat and her indomitable fighting spirit in the face of the most determined and fierce counterattacks by an alert and relentless enemy reflect the highest credit upon the REDFISH, her valiant officers and men and the United States Naval Service."


USS Redfish (SS-395) Ensign. . .

USS Redfish (SS-395) Ensign.
The USS Redfish (SS-395), a Balao-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the redfish, a name common to several species of deep-sea and coastal fish, especially salmon. The ensign is an approximately 52" X 76" 48-star bunting flag, with sewn stars & stripes, finished with a canvas header with two brass grommets. The flag is marked, "Redfish 2 Carriers etc."

Redfish began her brief but intense WWII wartime service in June of 1944, sinking the cargo ship Batopaha Maru, the tanker Ogura Maru on 16 September and the transport Mizuho Maru before October. Next she sank the transport Hozan Maru and in concert with the USS Sea Devil (SS-400), she heavily damaged the Japanese aircraft carrier Junyo, putting that enemy ship out of action for the remainder of the war. In December of 1944 she sank the newly built Japanese carrier Unryu. To escape, she exceeded her maximum depth, cracking her pressure hull. She then reported to Portsmouth, New Hampshire for repairs. The vessel returned to Pearl Harbor on July 1945 and remained there for the duration of the war. She would remain in service until 1968.

In addition to her wartime exploits, the USS Redfish had a post war career in the movies. In 1954, the Redfish participated in the Walt Disney Studios Production of 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea, when she was fitted with a "prop" rear fin and hatch when Capt. Nemo's Nautilus' afterdeck was constructed on the Redfish's deck, allowing her to double for the surface running Nautilus in one of the most dramatic sequences in the film, when Nemo puts visitors out on the deck while the boat submerges.

She also starred, after deck and armament modifications, as the fictional USS Nerka in the 1958 motion picture Run Silent, Run Deep, starring Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster. The Redfish ended her show business career on television, appearing anonymously in several episodes of the black & white series The Silent Service.

The ensign of the Redfish is a find for collectors of submarine flags, WWII in the Pacific collectors, WWII movie buffs and Disney collectors.

USS Redfish Awards: The Navy Presidential Unit Citation, American Campaign Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with two service stars, World War II Victory Medal and Navy Occupation Service Medal.

Condition: The ensign of the Redfish is used, worn and soiled but otherwise intact.

This flag was formerly in the collection of Dr. Clarence Rungee, and is accompanied by his original museum inventory sheet with identifying information.

For those who did not receive a hard copy of the auction catalog, we present here the introductory comments and history of Dr. Rungee and his remarkable collection. If you scroll further, you will also find various contemporary newspaper articles, as well as a selection of the many letters of donation and transmittal which accompanied the collection and a categorization of the collection.


Contents

Redfish arrived at Pearl Harbor on 27 June 1944. Departing 23 July, she sank the 5,953-ton Japanese cargo ship Batopaha Maru on 25 August, the 7,311 ton tanker Ogura Maru Number Two on 16 September, and the 8,506 ton transport Mizuho Maru on 21 September, all off Formosa, before arriving at Midway Island on 2 October. Departing Midway on 25 October and Saipan on 3 November, she sank the 2,345 ton Japanese transport Hozan Maru during the night of 22 November – 23 November. Departing Saipan on 1 December, she combined with Sea Devil (SS-400) the night of 8 December – 9 December to heavily damage the Japanese aircraft carrier Junyō, putting that enemy ship out of action for the remainder of the war.

Redfish sank the newly built 18,500 ton Japanese aircraft carrier Unryū, bound for Mindoro, on 19 December. After diving to 232 feet (71 m), she rose to the surface and raced to escape Japanese pursuit. Arriving at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard for repairs on 17 February 1945, she returned to Pearl Harbor 23 July, and remained there until the end of the war.

Redfish received a Presidential Unit Citation which read "For extraordinary heroism in action during the First and Second War Patrols against enemy Japanese surface units in the restricted waters of the Pacific. Operating in bold defiance of foul weather and persistent hostile depth charging, gunfire and bombing by outnumbering forces of radar-equipped ships, air escorts and patrol craft, the U.S.S. REDFISH launched her accurate and intensive gun and torpedo fire during brief periods of concentrated attack to sink a new Japanese aircraft carrier with her entire complement of embarked planes and equipment destined to be used against our forces, to damage severely another vital carrier and to destroy or cripple much additional shipping necessary to the enemy’s continued prosecution of the war. Although forced to the bottom in 230 feet of water by vicious countermeasures, with her pressure hull cracked and numerous leaks throughout, the REDFISH responded gallantly to the superb handling of her skilled and aggressive ship's company and succeeded in evading further damage and returning to port. Her brilliant record of success in combat and her indomitable fighting spirit in the face of the most determined and fierce counterattacks by an alert and relentless enemy reflect the highest credit upon the REDFISH, her valiant officers and men and the United States Naval Service."

After duty at Guam from September 1945 to January 1946, she arrived at San Diego, California, on 30 January. Departing on 3 March 1947, she voyaged to Guam and Japan before returning 21 June. After operations off the West Coast and Hawaii, she sailed toward Korea on 2 February 1951, and operated out of Yokosuka, Japan, until 24 June, in support of United Nations forces. Returning to San Diego on 3 July, she operated off the West Coast.

In the spring of 1954, fitted with a "dummy" rear fin, Redfish played the part of Jules Verne's Nautilus in the Walt Disney film 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea where the afterdeck of the Nautilus was constructed on the deck of the Redfish for a scene where the captain puts visitors out on the deck while the boat submerges. [5] In September 1957, with deck and armament modifications, she played the part of the fictional submarine USS Nerka in the 1958 motion picture Run Silent, Run Deep. She capped her film career by making several appearances in the popular black-and-white television series The Silent Service.

Reclassified AGSS-395 on 1 July 1960, she was underway from San Diego, California, on western Pacific deployment from 26 March to 26 September. From then into 1968, she made annual training cruises to the western Pacific. Decommissioned on 27 June 1968 at San Diego, she was struck from the Naval Vessel Register 30 June, and sunk as a target by USS Medregal (AGSS-480).


Redfish SS-395 - History

Chef Adrianne Calvo has taken her signature Maximum Flavor style under the sea! Redfish by Chef Adrianne serves as a rebirth of the famous Redfish Grill inside the historic Matheson Hammock Park. After years of traveling across the United States’ seafood capitals and the French Riviera, immersing herself in various cultures and learning from actual fishermen, Chef Adrianne has created a menu that mixes new American seafood with traditional fish house classics. What’s more, Redfish by Chef Adrianne features an extensive beer, wine, and whiskey library, to go along with craft cocktails designed by the chefs instead of mixologists, ultimately elevating the dining experience. With the opening of Redfish by Chef Adrianne, patrons can once again head into Matheson Hammock Park looking to enjoy the only waterfront restaurant in Coral Gables. Only this time, they’re experiencing Maximum Flavor!

Chef Adrianne Calvo has taken her signature Maximum Flavor style under the sea! Redfish by Chef Adrianne serves as a rebirth of the famous Redfish Grill inside the historic Matheson Hammock Park.


Contents

Redfish arrived at Pearl Harbor on 27 June 1944. Departing 23 July, she sank the 5,953-ton Japanese cargo ship Batopaha Maru on 25 August, the 7,311 ton tanker Ogura Maru Number Two on 16 September, and the 8,506 ton transport Mizuho Maru on 21 September, all off Formosa, before arriving at Midway Island on 2 October. Departing Midway on 25 October and Saipan on 3 November, she sank the 2,345 ton Japanese transport Hozan Maru during the night of 22 November – 23 November. Departing Saipan on 1 December, she combined with Sea Devil  (SS-400) the night of 8 December – 9 December to heavily damage the Japanese aircraft carrier Junyō, putting that enemy ship out of action for the remainder of the war.

Redfish sank the newly built 18,500 ton Japanese aircraft carrier Unryū, bound for Mindoro, on 19 December. After diving to 232 feet (71 m), she rose to the surface and raced to escape Japanese pursuit. Arriving at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard for repairs on 17 February 1945, she returned to Pearl Harbor 23 July, and remained there until the end of the war.

Redfish received a Presidential Unit Citation which read "For extraordinary heroism in action during the First and Second War Patrols against enemy Japanese surface units in the restricted waters of the Pacific. Operating in bold defiance of foul weather and persistent hostile depth charging, gunfire and bombing by outnumbering forces of radar-equipped ships, air escorts and patrol craft, the U.S.S. REDFISH launched her accurate and intensive gun and torpedo fire during brief periods of concentrated attack to sink a new Japanese aircraft carrier with her entire complement of embarked planes and equipment destined to be used against our forces, to damage severely another vital carrier and to destroy or cripple much additional shipping necessary to the enemy’s continued prosecution of the war. Although forced to the bottom in 230 feet of water by vicious countermeasures, with her pressure hull cracked and numerous leaks throughout, the REDFISH responded gallantly to the superb handling of her skilled and aggressive ship's company and succeeded in evading further damage and returning to port. Her brilliant record of success in combat and her indomitable fighting spirit in the face of the most determined and fierce counterattacks by an alert and relentless enemy reflect the highest credit upon the REDFISH, her valiant officers and men and the United States Naval Service."


he actual ship's design is based on Hiryuu's design. However, the ship-girl has a design completely different to Hiryuu's own, with the reason being that the ship was in chinese waters.

Unryuu wears a blue and white vest with green trimming, a miniskirt and green thighhighs along with greaves and platform rudder shoes. Most parts of her clothes have cloud-like patterning. A cradle-type rigging painted green is attached to her, holding several AA guns and machinery. Like Ryuujou and the Hiyou-class, she uses shikigami as planes but unlike them, her flight deck is attached as a banner to a staff and her hangar is a tiny building-looking thing. Also unlike them is the way she transforms her paper into planes, using energy torii instead of transforming them on the spot. Also attached to the staff is a cloud-shaped plate with her name written on it. Her flightdeck is already painted into a green camouflage pattern.

Her design changes after her remodel. The vest is now teal, green and white, the skirt as well and her thighhighs are now brown. Her flight deck now features a green and brown camouglage pattern. More importantly is the addition of green lightning over her head, featuring like horns and around the hangar, levitating it in the process, leaving both of her hands free to hold the staff.

When damaged, she will let go curly cloud-shaped smoke puffs.

She has very long silver hair in a long braid, with the head area kept short, in an asymmetrical hairstyle with curled bangs that is shaped like a cloud. A green orb is embedded into her braid. She also has light brown eyes, in a soft but constant flat gaze. One similarity with her 'sisters' is the tendency to be drawn with large breasts.

Her design, which is completely unlike the previous fleet carrier designs, caught off-guard fans who thought she would closely resemble Souryuu and Hiryuu, her models.


Redfish on the Table

Red drums are an excellent food fish up to a weight of about ten pounds. Larger fish may be coarse, stringy, and less palatable.

Red drum are delicious when fried, broiled, smoked, and incorporated into dishes such as redfish courtbouillon. They are often broiled or grilled "on the half shell" as filets with skin and scales left on. The "throats" of red drum are very meaty and should be harvested and enjoyed. They are delicious fried or smoked. After fileting and removing the throats, the carcass can be used to make a rich, flavorful stock.


What Happened to the Red Fish of Redfish Lake?

Over the past several decades, Redfish Lake has become an incredibly popular summer destination for camping, boating, fishing, and simply spending time with family. But have you ever stopped to wonder what this environment looked like before humans reigned supreme?

A view from the shore of Redfish Lake in Stanley, Idaho

Redfish Lake was formed by thousands of years of glaciation. It’s one of the largest alpine lakes on the eastern side of the Sawtooth Mountains, extending for five miles and reaching depths of nearly four hundred feet. Nestled among pristine forests and alpine ecosystems, Redfish Lake has historically been a haven for the sockeye salmon.

The sockeye salmon is an anadromous species of fish, meaning that they are born and reproduce in freshwater, but they migrate to the ocean where they spend most their adult life. When the sockeyes return to their freshwater homes to reproduce, they turn bright red and grow an aesthetically unpleasing hump-back.

An adult sockeye salmon ready to spawn.

As recently at 150 years ago, the sockeye salmon were so abundant in Redfish Lake, that the entire lake would look bright red. Moreover, the sockeyes would keep ranchers up all night with their loud splishy-splashy swimming as they traveled up the Salmon River. But today, Redfish Lake is a crystal-clear blue all summer and the riverbanks of the Salmon remains quiet and peaceful. In 2019, only 18 sockeye salmon returned to Redfish Lake.

So, what happened to the sockeye salmon? To put it simply, human industrialism.

The decline of the sockeye salmon population began in the mid-to-late 1800s with the introduction of commercial fishing and resource extraction in Central Idaho. Commercial canneries came into the Sawtooth Valley and fished salmon to the brink of extinction. Meanwhile, mining, logging, and ranching operations degraded habitat and decreased sockeye populations. By 1888, salmon populations were so low that Idaho’s first fish hatchery was developed to keep the canning companies in business. By the end of the century, Idahoans were already keenly aware that salmon populations were in terrible shape.

Custer a ghost mining town in Central Idaho still stands today.

Today, the sockeye salmon must navigate a whole different set of obstacles as they migrate to and from Redfish Lake. To be specific, they have eight very tall obstacles. The eight dams along the Columbia and Snake rivers are one of the most significant hurdles for the sockeye salmon today. These dams have turned 900 miles of cold, nutrient-rich, and fast-moving river into a collection of warm and muddy reservoirs. This slow-moving water makes it more difficult for the juvenile salmon to reach the ocean. The 900-mile journey used to take about three weeks, now it takes two to three months! That means more time that these fish can die due to predation, disease, and overheating.

The journey is not so easy for the adult fish either. Our development of infrastructure to help fish pass dams has not been particularly successful. For example, fish ladders have led to more bird predation throughout the Pacific Northwest. Furthermore, fish hatcheries have struggled to improve salmon populations, likely because juvenile salmon raised in concrete bins tend to lack the competencies required to survive in the wild.

People fishing next to Bonneville Dam, one of the largest of the eight dams that the sockeye salmon must pass.

The continued decline of the salmon populations is hitting our ecosystems and our communities hard. The wildlife and fragile forest ecosystems of Idaho rely on the ocean nutrients brought back by salmon to stay happy and healthy. Native fishermen who have been living in this area for thousands of years rely on these salmon to feed their communities. And of course, Idaho’s economy greatly benefits from our booming recreational fishing industry.

So, for the past several years, scientist have been considering removing some of these dams that are impacting salmon populations. But taking actions to remove dams is not an easy decision, right? Idaho and the greater Pacific Northwest would not be what it is today without the region’s dams. Many dams provide our communities with jobs, electricity, and flood control for agricultural lands.

The big question that scientists have had to answer is: how do we restore salmon runs without harming our communities?

After years of investigation, studies from the federal government, tribal governments, and independent entities have found that just four dams need to be removed to improve sockeye salmon populations (out of the 400 dams that control the Columbia River Basin). These four dams are along the lower Snake River. They are ‘run-of-river dams’ meaning they do not offer much flood control for agricultural purposes or hydroelectricity.

The primary reason these dams were built in the 1960s and 1970s was to transport grain and other agricultural goods from Idaho to Washington and Oregon. The plan was to make Idaho a major seaport irrespective of the fact that Idaho is over 900 miles from the ocean. Today, these dams still serve the purpose of aiding barge travel, but many Idahoans believe that removing the dams and transitioning to freight travel is economically viable and quite frankly, a no-brainer to prevent the extinction of the sockeye salmon and other native fish species.

Starting with the development of Idaho’s first fish hatchery in 1888, we have been trying desperately to engineer a human-controlled ecosystem that is superior to Mother Nature’s creation. After 132 years, we have created genetically inferior fish and aquatic habitats devoid of nutrients and oxygen. The salmon of the Salmon River have been replaced by non-native trout and Redfish Lake is stocked with everything but the iconic red fish. Estimates have found that we spend $9,000 on each sockeye salmon in the Snake River Tributary yet between 1985 and 2007, an average of 18 sockeye salmon annually returned to Idaho.

If we have learned anything over the past century, it is that we cannot industrialize our way out of this salmon population problem. Our best chance of revitalizing our rivers, our communities, and our recreation industry is to get rid of the concrete and let the Snake River run free all the way to Redfish Lake.


Post War service and movie career

After duty at Guam from September 1945 to January 1946, she arrived at San Diego, California, on 30 January. Departing on 3 March 1947, she voyaged to Guam and Japan before returning 21 June. After operations off the West Coast and Hawaii, she sailed toward Korea on 2 February 1951, and operated out of Yokosuka, Japan, until 24 June, in support of United Nations forces. Returning to San Diego on 3 July, she operated off the West Coast.

In the spring of 1954, fitted with a "dummy" rear fin, Redfish played the part of Jules Verne's Nautilus in the Walt Disney film 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea where the Nautilus's afterdeck was constructed on the Redfish's deck for a scene where the captain puts visitors out on the deck while the ship submerges. [ 5 ] In September 1957, with deck and armament modifications, she played the part of the fictional submarine USS Nerka in the 1958 motion picture Run Silent, Run Deep. She capped her film career by making several appearances in the popular black-and-white television series The Silent Service.

Reclassified AGSS-395 on 1 July 1960, she was underway from San Diego, California, on western Pacific deployment from 26 March to 26 September. From then into 1968, she made annual training cruises to the western Pacific. Decommissioned on 27 June 1968 at San Diego, she was struck from the Naval Vessel Register 30 June, and sunk as a target by USS Medregal (AGSS-480).


Watch the video: USS COD Navy Week 2012 - USS REDFISH crewman (January 2022).