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Cascade AD-16 - History

Cascade AD-16 - History


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Cascade
The Cascade Range is a northward extension of the Sierra Nevada mountains across the states of Oregon and Washington into British Columbia.

(AD-16: dp. 9,260; 1. 492'; b. 69'9"; dr. 27'6"; s. 18 k.;
cpl. 826; a. 1 5", 4 3"; cl. Cascade)

Cascade (AD-16) was launched 6 June 1942 by Western Pipe and Steel Co., San Francisco, Calif, sponsored by Mrs. C. W. Grosser and commissioned 12 March 1943, Captain S. B. Ogden in command.

Cascade cleared San Francisco 12 June 1943 for Pearl Harbor, where she began her war time duty of tending destroyers. As the war moved westward, Cascade followed, to bring her support close to the action areas. From November 1943, she was stationed successively at Kwajalein, Eniwetok, and Ulithi, while the ships she served ranged the Pacific, escorting convoys, screening carrier task forces, supporting invasions, and carrying out many other tasks with typical destroyer versatility.

In June 1945, Cascade sailed to Okinawa, where she endured the suicide raids and typhoon weather along with the combatants through September. She served in Wakayama Wan, and at Tokyo, Japan supporting the occupation until March 1946, when she sailed for the east coast. Cascade was decommissioned and placed in service in reserve at Philadelphia 12 February 1947.

Recommissioned 5 April 1951, Cascade was based on Newport, R I., as tender for the many destroyers homeported there. From this port she has cruised to the Caribbean and the Mediterranean for training and to support destroyers deployed in those areas. On these cruises Cascade has carried the flags of Commander, Service Force, 6th Fleet, and Comander, Destroyer Flotilla 6; she has also served as flagship for Commander, Destroyer Force, Atlantic, on occasion. The tender has carried out these duties through 1963.

Cascade received one battle star for World War II service.


Talk:USS Cascade (AD-16)

Is this copied from a website or book? It does say from the 1945 menu, but for a dinner menu to have survived that long? Since there has been no activity on this page for a good 8 months, I'm really wondering if this was just pulled from the web or something. Possible copyright infringement. TheConsortium 18:57, 1 March 2006 (UTC)

I haven't found an online source for this material, however if it was created by someone inside the Navy, then the work itself is in the public domain being that the Navy is a branch of the US Government (See Template:PD-USGov-Military-Navy, which is an image tag, but the same applied to written works as well). I plan to re-write this entry and incorporate its DANFS entry which is also in the public domain. -- malo (tlk) (cntrbtns) 16:23, 7 April 2006 (UTC)

I've removed a large chunk of unsourced text which was likely pinched from either [1], [2], [3] of those sources. The remainder is from DANFS. --Brad (talk) 17:02, 16 December 2007 (UTC)

This text is an excerpt of a letter written October 13, 1945 by the Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Cascade, Captain H. K. Gates, to the Secretary of the Navy, James V. Forrestal Subject: ”Factual History of the U.S.S. Cascade”

A copy of the letter may be found on the Fold3.com website (https://www.fold3.com/image/302052653) Subscription required. [1] Tomcat925 (talk) 23:57, 8 February 2018 (UTC)

I have in my possession a copy of the 1945 Christmas dinner menu from the USS CASCADE.

A destroyer tender is a “mother hen” for a vast brood of destroyers, and is a “mother hen” especially equipped and provided with ships capable of undertaking and completing repairs and overhaul of practically all the equipment on a destroyer from the common place typewriter to the powerful engines which drive them at high speeds in carrying out their mission. In addition the “mother hen” is provided with large and sundry rooms and refrigeration spaces from which the destroyers are provisioned, clothed, and provided with the necessary spare parts for their maintenance. In addition, and like all good mothers the “mother hen” takes care of many of the destroyers personnel in administering to their pains, ills, and injuries.

With World War II over, and the task of “tending” the Navy’s “tin-cans” being minimized, the USS CASCADE, like many of the other “mother-hens” has every reason in the world to crow—shout, if you wish, about all the good deeds which have been accomplished by the vessel in helping destroyers and other craft on the road to victory.

As a destroyer tender, the USS CASCADE’s role in the war has been that of repairing, overhauling and supplying combatant destroyers of the Third, Fifth and Seventh fleets. Up until the time the Philippine Islands were secured, every fleet turn around found the USS CASCADE busily engaged in preparing her assigned quota of ships for operations against the Japanese. Although designed primarily to handle destroyers and destroyer type vessels, the USS CASCADE in nearly three years of duty in the Pacific has serviced more than a thousand ships. The majority of destroyers and destroyer escorts which numbered nearly half that number were serviced as many as four times each. In addition, the ship has tended 175 landing craft (LST, LCI, LCM, LSD, and LCS), almost 100 sub-chasers, 60 transports, 32 cargo ships, 56 tankers, 37 mine sweepers, 10 cruisers, 7 aircraft carriers, and a miscellaneous group of other types neighboring around one hundred in number. Due to the long supply line which commenced to make itself felt in November 1943, the USS CASCADE was dovetailed into another assignment in addition to her original assignment. While machine shops hummed the new job added to the increasing tempo of the ship’s activity. During the two years of this duty, ten thousand tons of fresh and dry provisions were received and issued. Five hundred and fifty one tons of clothing were issued and an equal number of tons of ship’s store stock was sold by the ship. The combined value of these issues amounted to more than five million dollars.

A 15,000 ton destroyer tender the USS CASCADE was built by the Western Pipe and Steel Company of South San Francisco, California. Originally designed as a passenger-freighter, the keel for the CASCADE was laid July 6, 1942. The ship was sponsored by Mrs. Charles W. Crosse, wife of Rear Admiral Charles W. Crosse, USN. It was turned over to the Matson Navigation Company of San Francisco, California for outfitting in October of 1942. Joslyn & Ryan, Naval Architects of that city, assisted in the completion of the ship. On 12 March 1943 the USS CASCADE was placed in commission with Captain S. B. Ogden, as Commanding Officer. There were at that time thirty (30) officers, forty-five (45) Chief Petty Officers and six hundred twenty six (626) enlisted men in the crew. After thirty days at Mare Island Navy Yard where some necessary alterations were made the ship sailed for San Diego and engaged in training operations for a short period. At the conclusion of training orders were received to report for duty to Commander Destroyers Pacific Fleet, in connection with tending and repairing destroyers, and in accordance with these orders the ship sailed from the United States on 12 June 1943, arriving at Pearl Harbor 18 June 1943. As the activities of the ship increased it became necessary the latter part of 1943 to increase personnel of the ship to forty nine officers, eight Chief Petty Officers and one thousand fifty enlisted men.

During the two years and seven months that the USS CASCADE has been in commission the Commanding Officers have been, Captain Samuel B. OGDEN, US Navy, Paramount Apartments 565 Geary Street, San Francisco, California Captain Herbert K. GATES, US Navy, 919 North McLellan Street, Bay City, Michigan and the present Captain, Louis T. YOUNG, US Navy, 1816 North Louise Street, Glendale 7, California. It has sailed a distance of over fifteen thousand (15,000) miles, which for a ship of the Navy, is not an impressive figure, but nearly all of it was steamed in the forward operating areas as the war in the Pacific moved westward. In order to remain as close as possible to the operating areas of the Pacific Fleet, the USS CASCADE was stationed at the following islands and atolls during the periods as indicated:

Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, June—November 1943 Funafuti, Ellice Islands, November 1943—February 1944 Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, March—May 1944 Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands, July—October 1944 Ulithi Atoll, Caroline Islands, October 1944-May 1945 Kerama Retto, Okinawa, June 1945 Buckner Bay, Okinawa, July-September 1945 Wakayama, Japan, September 1945

Of these the most interesting, yet most hazardous location that the ship operated was at Kerama Retto, Okinawa during the month of June 1945. The main island of Okinawa had not as yet been secured and Kamikaze raids took place almost nightly. A few such raids were conducted during the daylight hours also. Kerama Retto served as a refuge for destroyers and smaller ships damaged by the Japanese fliers. Here these ships which the USS CASCADE and her sister tenders repaired were made ready once again for battle. Others which were more seriously damaged were made seaworthy for their long voyages to the Navy Yards of the United States. Among these ships who achieved nation wide publicity by their ability to sustain damage and still knock Japanese planes out of the air were the following vessels: USS LAFFEY, USS EVANS, USS CASSIN YOUNG, USS LEUTZE, USS BRAINE, USS STORMES, USS AARON WARD, and the USS SHANNON.

The ship is currently winding up a Pacific tour of duty while tending US Navy ships off Wakayama, Japan. The next assignment to the Reserve Fleet, Atlantic, will return the USS CASCADE to water and land the vessel has not seen in three years.

From the USS CASCADE Christmas 1945 Menu —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.242.200.179 (talk) 18:23, 29 June 2008 (UTC)


Contents

1943–1944 [ edit ]

Cascade cleared San Francisco on 12 June 1943 for Pearl Harbor, where she began her war time duty of tending destroyers. As the war moved westward, Cascade followed, bringing her support close to the action areas. From November 1943, she was stationed successively at Kwajalein, Eniwetok, and Ulithi, while the ships she served ranged the Pacific, escorting convoys, screening carrier task forces, supporting invasions, and carrying out many other tasks with typical destroyer versatility. Cascade was part of Service Squadron 10.

In June 1945, Cascade sailed to Okinawa, where she endured the suicide raids and typhoon weather. She left Okinawan waters in September to serve in Wakayama, Japan and later at Tokyo, Japan, supporting the occupation until March 1946, when she sailed for the East Coast. Cascade was decommissioned and placed in service in reserve at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on 12 February 1947.

In the autumn of 1943 Admiral Nimitz ordered the creation of two service squadrons. These two squadrons would provide mobile service to the fleet as it moved across the Pacific — with one service as fleet base while the second remained to the rear. As the fleet captured new sites the rear squadron would move to the front and act as fleet base.

Service Squadron 4 was commissioned on 1 November 1943. The squadron was made up of 24 vessels and would be based in Funafuti Atoll. The USS Cascade, Captain Samuel Ogden, was the flagship for the squadron and Captain Ogden was also chief staff officer for the squadron. The repair ships Phaon  (ARB-3) and Vestal  (AR-4) and 21 other ships comprised the squadron. On 21 November 1943 the Cascade arrived at Funafuti, where she remained until February 1944. During the stay at Funafuti the Cascade serviced numerous fleet vessels — including 10 destroyers and eight destroyer escorts.

During this period Captain Worrall Reed Carter (USNA 1908), was organizing the second service squadron. Service Squadron 10 was commissioned on 15 January 1944 at Pearl Harbor.

After the capture of Kwajalein in February 1944 the Cascade moved from Funafuti to Kwajalein. On 17 March 1944 Squadron 4 was absorbed into Squadron 10. Captain Herbert Meyer Scull (USNA 1919,) was reassigned as chief of staff for Rear Admiral Hoover, Commander Forward Area, Central Pacific. Captain Samuel Ogden in the Cascade became representative "A" of Commander Service Squadron 10 in command of Kwajalein and Roi.

The Cascade remained at Kwajalein until May 1944 when she moved to Eniwetok. On 5 June Commodore Carter joined SERVRON 10 at Eniwetok. His flagship was the Prairie  (AD-15) . The following ships were also present in July 1944: destroyer tenders Cascade, Piedmont  (AD-17) , and Markab  (AD-21) repair ship Hector  (AR-7) repair ship landing craft Egeria  (ARL-8) floating dry-docks ARD-13, ARD-15 mobile floating dry-dock AFD-15 and floating workshop YR-30. During July 1944 there were a large number of vessels present at Eniwetok. The daily average of ships present during the first half of July was 488 during the second half of July the daily average number of ships at Eniwetok was 283. By the end of July Commodore Carter flew to Pearl Harbor to participate in planning the move of Servron 10 facilities from Eniwetok to Ulithi.

Ulithi [ edit ]

On 4 October 1944 Service Squadron 10 began leaving Eniwetok for Ulithi. On 8 October 1944 Commodore Worrall R. Carter's flagship the Prairie, the merchant ammunition ship Plymouth Victory and the Cascade, Captain Herbert Kenneth Gates (USNA 1924), sailed for Ulithi. The Markab initially remained at Eniwetok, leaving for Ulithi on 18 October 1944 and arriving on 22 October. Service Squadron 10's conversion of the lagoon at Ulithi to a major naval resupply and staging area was one of the most remarkable feats of the war.

On 20 November 1944 the Ulithi harbor was attacked by Japanese kaiten human torpedoes launched from two nearby submarines. The destroyer Case  (DD-370) rammed one in the early morning hours. At 5:47 the fleet oiler Mississinewa  (AO-59) , at anchor in the harbor, was struck and sunk. Destroyers began dropping depth charges throughout the anchorage. At 6:25 the cruiser Mobile  (CL-63) reported that a torpedo had passed under its bow. The destroyer escorts Rall  (DE-304) , Halloran  (DE-305) , and Weaver  (DE-741) performed an anti-submarine attack in response to the torpedo attack and reported that an enemy submarine was sunk. Another enemy submarine was sunk by an air attack some 15 miles east of Ulithi. There were two explosions on the reef which indicated the presence of additional kaiten. After the war Japanese naval officers said that two tender submarines each carrying four manned torpedoes had been sent to attack the fleet at Ulithi. Three of the suicide torpedoes were unable to launch due to mechanical problems and another ran aground on the reef. Two did make it into the lagoon, one of which sank the Mississinewa.

Following operations at Leyte, Task Force 38 arrived at Ulithi on 24 December. Damaged ships from the force had preceded the main fleet by a few days. The repair ship Ajax  (AR-6) had begun work on the Altamaha  (CVE-18) and Jicarilla  (ATF-104) the Hector was repairing the San Jacinto  (CVL-30) the destroyer Dewey  (DD-349) was tied up to the Prairie for repairs the Cascade had the Buchanan  (DD-484) alongside the Dixie  (AD-14) was repairing the Dyson  (DD-572) .

On 4 March 1945 the destroyers Ringgold  (DD-500) and Yarnall  (DD-541) collided while conducting night battle drills while en route to Ulithi as part of Task Group 58.1. Ringgold's bow was sheared off to frame 22 and she was extensively damaged to frame 26 port and 38 starboard. Yarnall's bow was bent to the right and upward her bow broke off and sank during towing. Upon arrival at Ulithi the Ringgold went alongside the Cascade for installation of a temporary bow. In early April the Ringgold departed for Pearl Harbor for permanent repairs and the Yarnall left for Mare Island Navy Yard.

On 13 March 1945 there were 647 ships at anchor at Ulithi and with the arrival of amphibious forces staging at Ulithi for the invasion of Okinawa the number of ships at anchor peaked at 722. During the preparations for the Okinawa invasion the service load on Squadron 10 was extremely heavy.

On 8 March 1944 the Commander Service Squadron 10 created the Mobile Fleet Motion Picture Sub-Exchange No. 1. The Prairie operated the north exchange and the Cascade operated a branch exchange to service ships in the southern anchorage of Ulithi. The program issued 100 35-mm films and 652 16-mm films per day during December 1944.

Court of Inquiry [ edit ]

In December 1944 a court of inquiry was held in the wardroom of the Cascade, at Ulithi, regarding the loss of three ships and over 800 men from the US Third Fleet during a typhoon. The Third Fleet was under the command of William F. (Bull) Halsey, Jr. during the typhoon in mid-December 1944. Admiral Chester A. Nimitz, CINCPAC, was in attendance at the court. Forty-three-year-old Captain Herbert K. Gates, of the Cascade, was the judge advocate for the court. Gates was an expert in mechanical and marine engineering.

Mediterranean, 1951–1974 [ edit ]

Recommissioned on 5 April 1951, Cascade was based in Newport, Rhode Island, as tender for the many destroyers home-ported there. From Newport she cruised to the Caribbean and the Mediterranean to support the destroyers deployed there. During this time Cascade served as flagship, and carried the flag of commander, Service Force, 6th Fleet, and the flag of commander, Destroyer Flotilla 6. She also served as flagship for commander, Destroyer Force, Atlantic. She served in this role as flagship and tender up through 1963. From 1970 to 1974, the Cascade was forward deployed to the Mediterranean, homeported in Naples Italy. When was in the port of Naples Cascade was used even like a set for a scene of Italian Movie Polvere di stelle in 1973 with Alberto Sordi, Monica Vitti and John Phillip Law.

Decommissioning and sale [ edit ]

The Cascade was decommissioned on 22 November 1974 and struck from the Naval Register on 23 November 1974. She was subsequently sold for scrap to Luria Brother of Brooklyn, New York, and dismantled at the Gulmar Yard in Brownsville, Texas starting September 1975. The anchor, along with mooring cleats at the front entrance of the school, ended up at Danville High School in Danville, KY. The anchor has become a symbol of stability and security to all Danville Admirals. It keeps school spirit from drifting and stands as a constant reminder of admiral tradition. The anchor has been on loan from the Navy to DHS since it was placed. Ώ]


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Product Description

USS Cascade AD 16 1953

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

Mediterranean Cruise

February - June 1953 Cruise Book

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing the USS Cascade AD 16 cruise book during this time period. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Ports of Call: Cannes France, Algiers, Athens Greece, Beirut, Damascus, Riviera, Oran and Sardinia.
  • Preparations for getting Underway
  • Operation Rendezvous
  • Mail Call
  • Parties for the Kids
  • Replenishment at Sea
  • Division Group Photos (No Names)
  • Home Again
  • Many Crew Activity Photos
  • Plus Much More

Over 276 Photos on Approximately 86 Pages.

Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Destroyer Tender during this time period.


Cascade AD-16 - History

Mediterranean Cruise

February - June 1953 Cruise Book

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing the USS Cascade AD 16 cruise book during this time period. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Ports of Call: Cannes France, Algiers, Athens Greece, beirut, Damascus, Riviera, Oran and Sardinia.
  • Preparations for getting Underway
  • Operation Rendezvous
  • Mail Call
  • Parties for the Kids
  • Replenishment at Sea
  • Division Group Photos (No Names)
  • Home Again
  • Many Crew Activity Photos
  • Plus Much More

Over 276 Photos on Approximately 86 Pages.

Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Destroyer Tender during this time period.


During the 1870’s, prospectors and miners followed in Packer John’s footsteps to scour the valley and surrounding mountains for gold. The Clara Foltz mines opened on Paddy Flat, and other diggings commenced on Boulder and Gold Fork Creeks. Also during the 1870’s, two salmon fisheries operated seasonally on Payette Lake.

In the late 1870’s, the last of the Sheepeater Tribe was removed from Long Valley and Round Valley to a reservation. As the gold sources dwindled, a few of the miners took up squatter’s rights. James Horner built a cabin on Clear Creek in 1881. Other miners settled on the Payette River. In 1883, S.M. Sisk, a young miner from New York, settled near the old town site of Crawford. Later the same year, L.S. Kimble came from Illinois and began to cut trees at Tamarack Falls. A year later he moved to the site of VanWyck and opened the region’s first blacksmith shop. After Kimble came W.D. Patterson, T.L. Worthington, L.M. Gorton, John DeHaas, E.A. Smith and many others who contributed to the development around VanWyck, Crawford and Alpha.

In the 1880’s, a man named Maxey came to Round Valley to fatten hogs on the camas roots. Caroline Jarvis bought his homestead in 1888. Then in 1892, W.A. “Billy” Bacon, who came to Boise in 1863, married Sarah Jarvis and built a log cabin to begin his homestead in Round Valley.

In 1886, Jack Jasper established a homestead near what is now Roseberry. He estimated then that there were about thirty families in the valley. The Mark Cole and Blankenship families arrived in 1888 and, with Jack Jasper and the Pottengers, founded Roseberry. Also in 1888, the first post offices in Valley County were opened at VanWyck, on March 14, with L. Kimble as postmaster and, at Alpha, on July 12, with James Horner as postmaster.

In 1889, Louis McCall took squatter’s rights on Payette Lake. Other settlers in the area were the Yorkes, Albert Gaekel, Louis Heacock and Arthur Rowland. Their homesteads were the nucleus of what would later become the town of McCall.

A post office opened at Lardo in 1889 with John Lane as postmaster. Also, W.H. Boydstun established a freight stop at Lardo to service the increased mining activity at Warren Meadows.

An 1890 postal service map for the territory of Idaho shows post offices at Lardo, VanWyck and Alpha. That year, another post office opened at Crawford with James Biers as postmaster. The 1890 census stated 538 people resided in the VanWyck precinct, and 110 resided in the Alpha precinct.

Land survey maps drawn in the 1890’s show four schools: one at Alpha and three in the Crawford-VanWyck area. Pioneer testimony tells about a fifth school located on Timber Ridge near McCall. The maps also point out sawmills at Warner’s Pond and on Gold Fork Creek, as well as a small reservoir near VanWyck. And, in 1896, the Warren Dredge Co. opened a sawmill on Payette Lake.

The Wain family, who settled above Payette Lake, was the first Finnish family in Valley County. Next came the Koskellas, Haralas and Lahtis in 1895 to settle near Gold Fork. In their wake came Edvart Poro, Edward Rimakangas, Mikko Hentila and the Syrjamaki family, until a sizeable Finnish community existed east of Lake Fork. They quickly organized a school, and in 1901 formed the Finnish Mutual Fire Insurance Co. The Elo post office opened in 1905 with Pastor Eloheimo as postmaster. Soon after, the Finnish church and cemetery were erected at the old stopping place of Spink. The Finnish community continued to grow until the 1930’s when Finns and their descendants in Long Valley numbered 400.

The 1890’s were a period of strife for the new settlers. Ranchers from south of Long Valley annually brought their large herds of cattle to graze in Long Valley. The homesteaders resented the intrusion and retaliated on several occasions by slaughtering the outsiders’ cattle. This tension existed for some years until the U.S. Forest Service began to regulate grazing.

Although gold was first discovered in the Thunder Mountain area in 1893, enthusiasm for the area didn’t begin until 1902, when W.H. Dewey began mining on a large scale. As many as 3,000 miners swarmed into the region seeking their fortunes. As a result, the town of Roosevelt evolved, only to be destroyed by an immense landslide in 1908. Because the area had neverlived up to mining expectations, activity there died out soon after the landslide.

Probably the most important event in the Valley County area in the twentieth century was the coming of the railroad. In 19l4, the Union Pacific completed its track from Emmett to McCall, making commercial logging profitable. Logging then became, along with farming and ranching, the economic mainstay of Long Valley for many years. Towns distant from the railroad, such as Alpha, Crawford and Roseberry, soon lost their vitality and died. Towns near the railroad, such as Cascade, Donnelly and McCall, thrived and became the population centers of Valley County. Elo, Thunder City, Pearsol, Norwood and Spink eventually lost their activity to the three major towns. There were numerous private mills located throughout the county in the 1900’s. In October of 1977 the last log went through the Boise Cascade Corporation’s sawmill on Payette Lake in McCall – in May of 2001 Boise Cascade Corporation’s sawmill in Cascade was closed.

In 1917, Valley County was created by the Idaho State legislature. Prior to that, it had been part of Boise County and Idaho County, both of which were created when Idaho was a territory. The portion of Boise County appears to have been in the North Fork of the Payette River drainage. The portion of Idaho County appears to have been in the Salmon River drainage.

In 1948, the Cascade Dam was completed on the Payette River. The reservoir was created for retention of water for irrigation and flood control. The back waters from this dam covered some of the best farming and ranch land in the valley and caused the rerouting of Highway 55 over Little Donner. It also caused many families to be relocated, some of them against their will. Since then the reservoir has been renamed Lake Cascade and has become a renowned fishery and recreational water.


Cascade AD-16 - History

From: Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

The Cascade Range is a northward extension of the Sierra Nevada mountains across the states of Oregon and Washington into British Columbia. AD - 16: dp. 9,260 l. 492' b. 69'9"

dr. 27'6" s. 18 k. cpl. 826 a. 1 x 5", 4 x 3"

Cascade (AD-16) was launched 6 June 1942 by Western Pipe and Steel Co., San Francisco, Calif. sponsored by Mrs. C. W. Grosse and commissioned 12 March 1943, Captain S. B. Ogden in command.

Cascade cleared San Francisco 12 June 1943 for Pearl Harbor, where she began her war time duty of tending destroyers. As the war moved westward, Cascade followed, to bring her support close to the action areas. From November 1943, she was stationed successively at Kwajalein, Eniwetok, and Ulithi, while the ships she served ranged the Pacific, escorting convoys, screening carrier task forces, supporting invasions, and carrying out many other tasks with typical destroyer versatility.

In June 1945, Cascade sailed to Okinawa, where she endured the suicide raids and typhoon weather along with the combatants through September. She served in Wakayama Wan, and at Tokyo, Japan, supporting the occupation until March 1946, when she sailed for the east coast. Cascade was decommissioned and placed in service in reserve at Philadelphia 12 February 1947.


USS Yosemite (AD 19)

USS YOSEMITE was the fifth ship in the DIXIE - class of destroyer tenders and the fourth ship in the Navy named after the Yosemite National Park. Both decommissioned and stricken from the Navy list on January 27, 1994, the YOSEMITE spent the following almost 9 years laid-up in the National Defense Reserve Fleet at Fort Eustis, Va. The YOSEMITE was finally sunk as a target off the US east coast on November 18, 2003.

General Characteristics: Awarded: 1941
Keel laid: January 19, 1942
Launched: May 16, 1943
Commissioned: May 25, 1944
Decommissioned: January 27, 1994
Builder: Tampa Shipbuilding Co. Inc., Tampa, Fla.
Propulsion system: four boilers, geared turbines
Propellers: two
Length: 530.5 feet (161.7 meters)
Beam: 73.2 feet (22.3 meters)
Draft: 25.6 feet (7.8 meters)
Displacement: approx. 17,176 tons full load
Speed: 19.5 knots
Aircraft: Flight Deck only, however, not suitable for helo landings
Armament: 4 20mm Mk-68 guns
Crew: approx. 1000

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS YOSEMITE. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.

USS YOSEMITE Cruise Books:

About the Ship's Coat of Arms:

USS YOSEMITE's official insignia depicts a scene viewed through a ship's portal of a mountain lion stretched in the foreground with the mountains of Yosemite National Park in the background. The YOSEMITE's nickname - "The Busy Lady" - is shown on the official insignia and indicates the ship's role as a repair facility ready and able to service units of the Atlantic Fleet at any time.

The YOSEMITE had been serving the fleet for more than 20 years when Warner Brothers introduced its Yosemite Sam character in 1966. As he became more popular, it became inevitable that the irascible, but lovable, character who shared the same name would become associated with the YOSEMITE. Before long, he became a mascot of sorts for the ship, and subsequently could be found on an unofficial version of the ship's insignia. Warner Brothers gave the YOSEMITE permission to reproduce Yosemite Sam's likeness for official command use in 1979. He could be found on everything from ship's patches to letterhead paper, though regulations prevented him from ever being used in the official insignia. Yosemite Sam will remain a colorful part of the YOSEMITE's tradition as long as there is a ship in the United States Navy that bears the name.

USS YOSEMITE was commissioned on 25 May 1944 during WWII. USS YOSEMITE's proud record of 43 outstanding years of service to the fleet began August 19, 1944 in Pearl Harbor when the USS CALDWELL pulled alongside, 216 ships followed during those first five months and set an impressive pattern that earned both respect and the nickname "Busy Lady". In the year and a half between 1944 and 1946, YOSEMITE earned her spot as a War Veteran tending U.S. Navy ships at Enewetok Atoll, the Caroline Islands and Okinawa, finally joining the Navy's task force in Sasebo, Japan, at the war's end in 1945. Receiving her first stateside assignment in 1946, YOSEMITE moved to Newport, Rhode Island, where she was homeported for 23 years prior to moving in 1969 to her new home at Mayport, Florida.

Though support ships like the YOSEMITE don't always get the attention their fighting counterparts do, the YOSEMITE has had her share of honor and recognition over the years. In 1946 she was named the Flagship of Commander Destroyer Force, U.S. Atlantic, a job held almost continously for the next 16 years. She served as Flagship for the famous Admiral Arleigh Burke before he reported to Washington as Chief of Naval Operations in 1955.

When the Atlantic Fleet Cruiser and Destroyer Forces merged into a single Cruiser Destroyer Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet in 1962, YOSEMITE was named the Flagship for the Commanders of Destroyer Flotillas Two and Twelve.

After completing a successful five month Mediterranean deployment in June 1980, YOSEMITE received a well deserved rest and face-lift during a one year overhaul period at the Alabama Dry Dock and Shipbuilding Company, Mobile, Alabama. During this overhaul period, the YOSEMITE underwent renovations to enable her to provide the most up-to-date repair service for the Navy's modern and increasingly complex destroyers.

In April 1982, YOSEMITE welcomed aboard the first contingent of enlisted women as a part of the crew. Since then the number of female crewmembers grew to include nearly every rating present aboard YOSEMITE.

In 1983, YOSEMITE deployed to the Indian Ocean, travelling halfway around the world to provide repair services to other deployed ships. The "Busy Lady" returned to Mayport, Florida, on 21 March 1984 with her head held high after completing one of her most successful deployments in 40 years of service.

In 1984, for the second time in her history, YOSEMITE sailed south to participate in READEX 2-84 off the coast of Puerto Rico. 1984 ended with a milestone on board YOSEMITE when she successfully underwent an arduous OPPE in early December administered by the CINCLANTFLT Propulsion Examining Board (PEB). This was the first occasion for the YOSEMITE to be tested against the newly reorganized and more stringent standards developed by the Board.

Underway again in March 1985, this time enroute to Charleston, South Carolina, YOSEMITE stepped in for her sister ship, USS SIERRA (AD 18), to provide repair service for Navy ships based there.

During the latter part of 1985, YOSEMITE completed a ten week overhaul period at the Alabama Drydock and Shipbuilding Company located in Mobile, Alabama. Work completed during this time in Engineering and Deck department spaces allowed YOSEMITE to meet 1986 deployment commitments, which included providing services to the Sixth Fleet, Military Sealift Command, and units of the Rapid Deployment Joint Task Force.

On 31 July 1987, a new era began for YOSEMITE when Capt. Floyston A. Weeks took command. Under Capt. Weeks' guidance, the ship began aggressive training and refurbishing to prepare for the 1988 deployment, and to meet new and expanded requirements set forth by the CNO for fleet tenders.

On 29 February 1988, YOSEMITE departed Mayport and joined the USS EISENHOWER (CVN 69) Carrier Battle Group on the transit to the Mediterranean. She established an early reputation for outstanding service by providing "FlyAway" repair teams that were dispatched to the other ships in the Carrier Group. This in-transit repair work helped maintain a high state of readiness for the U.S. Navy Atlantic Sixth Fleet, and brought weekly "Bravo Zulus" to YOSEMITE for the crew's excellent efforts. With high quality in repair and services as a hallmark throughout this deployment, the YOSEMITE became known as "The Battle Tender" of the Sixth Fleet.

USS YOSEMITE was decommissioned on 27 January 1994, at her homeport of Mayport, Fla.


Cascade Township

This township was formed from territory taken from Hepburn and Plunkett's August 9, 1843. Its name was given to it on account of the many little cascades and waterfalls found in its dashing streams and murmuring rivulets. It is the sixth township in size in the county and has 29,800 acres. The census for 1890 gives the township a population of 609. It is bounded on the east by Sullivan county and Plunkett's Creek township, Lycoming county, on the north by McIntyre, on the west by Lewis and Gamble, and on the south by Eldred and Plunkett's Creek.

Burnett's ridge, which was designated as a line at the Indian purchase of 1768, sweeps across the township into Sullivan county. It begins below Bodines on Lycoming creek. This ridge is a famous landmark of early times and possesses more than ordinary historical interest. Its name was probably given to it in honor of William Burnett, who flourished in the, reign of William and Mary, and succeeded to the government of the Colony of in 1720. Stone, in his Life of Sir William Johnson (Vol. I, page 30) says that with the exception of Colonel Dongan, his Indian policy was marked by the most prudent forecast and the greatest wisdom. He became a great Indian trader and built a fort at Oswego for the protection of his agents and stores from the French.He commanded the respect and enjoyed the full confidence of the Indians. There is little doubt that this ridge was named after him on account of some incident or circumstance to us now unknown.

The principal streams in this township are the east and west branches of Wallis run, which empties into Loyalsock Salt run, which heads in Burnett's ridge and empties into Wallis run in Gamble township, and Slack's run, which falls into Lycoming creek.

Cascade consists of Red Catskill (No. IX), which forms an elevated valley some 1.600 to 1,700 feet above tide, and embraces the greater part of the township. On the north and south edges there are ridges of Pocono rock (No. X), some of which are capped by Mauch Chunk red shales (No. XI), and some areas of Pottsville conglomerate. There are many good and well cultivated farms in the township.

The mineral deposits are not much known, not having been exploited. There are deposits of copper shale reported of sufficient thickness to invite further attention. The surface of the township is mostly within the Allegheny mountain plateau and consists of a mountain valley between two ridges. The moraine appears on Slack's run, where a drift hill extends across the valley and rests against Burnett's ridge, showing very distinctly strong glacial action.

First Settlers. - Michael Kelly, who penetrated the forests at the head of Wallis run in July, 1843, was the first settler in the fastnesses of Cascade. He cut a road through the woods from DuBois's saw mill, on Lycoming, to the present Kellysburg, six miles, so that he could get an ox team and wagon. through. This was the first road in this part of the county and over it Mr. Kelly hauled the lumber used in the construction of his log house, and also moved his family in by the same means. In October of the same year he was followed by a Mr. Lang, of Philadelphia, who purchased the property and erected the buildings now owned by Peter O'Connor. The next few years he was followed by Patrick Cummings, Bernard, Thomas, Patrick, and Edward Norton, Lawrence Ging, Michael Kehoe, Jeremiah and James Lee, John Smith, Thomas Noon, Michael Cox, William McEnarney, George Nevell, William and John Davis, Henry Riley, Samuel Stall, James Condon, John and Joseph Keefer, Thomas Logue, Patrick Flanagan, Thomas and Patrick Kinney, Michael Barry, John and Patrick Davis, Matthias McDonald, William O'Brien, Peter O'Connor, Richard Farrell, and others. Each purchased a property and erected buildings.

In 1845 John and Matthias DuBois rented a mill seat and water power from Mr. Kelly and erected a saw mill on it, in which they placed a pair of buhrs to do the grinding for the settlement. At that time grist mills were scarce and the settlers in Plunkett's Creek township and Fox township, Sullivan county, cut paths through the woods and brought their grain on horseback to that mill to be ground. In 1852 the mill took fire from a hot journal and was burned. Its loss was so severely felt in the settlements that Mr. Kelly was induced to rebuild it in 1858. A few years later he converted it into a circular saw mill and manufactured lumber on it until 1873, when he erected a large steam mill and continued in the lumber business until the spring of 1877, when he quit the lumber business and moved to Kansas, where he died in 1883.

Kellysburg. - The settlement founded by Michael Kelly nearly fifty years ago is now known as Kellysburg. He was an active, enterprising man, and through his efforts aided largely in reclaiming what was a wild and inhospitable region. Some of his descendants still reside there. Michael Kelly was the Democratic nominee for sheriff in 1872, and after an exceedingly bitter and exciting campaign was cruelly defeated. The blow was such a severe one that it seemed to break his spirit, and as soon as he could dispose of his property be left the county and located in the new State of Kansas. And so ended the life of the brave, hardy enterprising, big-hearted pioneer of Cascade.

The only postoffice in the township is at Kellysburg. It was established July 25, 1866, and Michael Kelly was appointed postmaster. He served until January 10, 1878, when be was succeeded by Mary Kelly. She only served eighteen days, when, on January 28, 1878, she was succeeded by Mary A. Kelly, the present incumbent. It will be seen that a member of the Kelly family has held the office from the beginning, a period of twenty-six years.

The descendants of the first settlers of Cascade have proved themselves honorable, talented, progressive, and worthy citizens.

St. Mary's Catholic Church is the only church in the township. As early as 1848 Catholic services were hold in the houses of Michael Kelly and John Keefer by Fathers O'Keefe, Hannigan, and others. Nearly all the first settlers of the township were members of this faith, and attended Mass whenever the opportunity offered. In 1854 a small frame building was erected on the farm of Patrick Kinney, who donated land for a church and cemetery. It stood a couple of miles Southwest of Kellysburg, and served the congregation until the erection of the present church. The lumber was given by John and Matthias DuBois, and Levi Hartman was the carpenter. In 1878 the old church was removed, and the present one erected on the same site by Father Dunn. It is 40x80 feet in dimensions. Edward F. Noon was the builder. St. Mary's is a mission, and has always been in charge of the pastor of an adjoining parish. It embraces seventy-five families, and is the only congregation and house of worship in the township.

Schools. - Cascade has four school houses, named as follows: Kelly, McLaughlin, Slack Run, and Wallis Run.


Cascade AD-16 - History


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