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September 24, 2013 Day 248 of the Fifth Year - History

September 24, 2013 Day 248 of the Fifth Year - History


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President Barack Obama and former President Bill Clinton are bathed in blue light as they talk backstage prior to participating in the the Clinton Global Initiative Healthcare Forum at the Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers in New York, N.Y., Sept. 24, 2013. Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, right, waits to introduce them

10:10AM THE PRESIDENT addresses the United Nations General Assembly - THE FIRST LADY also attends
North Lawn Building- The United Nations Complex

10:50AM THE PRESIDENT meets with John Ashe, President of the United Nations General Assembly
North Lawn Building- The United Nations Complex

11:35AM THE PRESIDENT holds a bilateral meeting with President Michel Sleiman of the Republic of Lebanon
Conference Building- The United Nations Complex

12:50PM THE PRESIDENT meets with United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon
Conference Building- The United Nations Complex

1:15PM THE PRESIDENT attends a luncheon hosted by United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon
Conference Building- The United Nations Complex

3:00PM THE PRESIDENT holds a meeting with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas
Conference Building- The United Nations Complex

4:55PM THE PRESIDENT participates in a conversation with former President Clinton about the future of health care reform
Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers

7:35PM THE PRESIDENT delivers remarks at DNC reception
Waldorf Astoria Hotel
Print Pool

9:00PM In-Town Travel Pool Call Time

9:40PM THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY depart New York en route Andrews Air Force Base
John F. Kennedy International Airport
Open Press

10:35PM THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY arrive Joint Base Andrews
Out-of-Town Travel Pool Coverage

10:50PM THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY arrive the White House
South Lawn


FDA-led Patient-Focused Drug Development (PFDD) Public Meetings

People living with a condition are uniquely positioned to inform the understanding of the therapeutic context for drug development and evaluation. In 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) established the Patient-Focused Drug Development (PFDD) initiative to more systematically obtain the patient perspective on specific diseases and their currently available treatments. PFDD meetings are unique among FDA public meetings, with a format designed to engage patients and elicit their perspectives on two topic areas: (1) the most significant symptoms of their condition and the impact of the condition on daily life and, (2) their current approaches to treatment.

From 2012 to 2017, under the fifth authorization of PDUFA (PDUFA V), FDA conducted 24 disease-specific patient-focused drug development (PFDD) meetings to more systematically obtain the patient perspective on specific diseases and their treatments. PFDD meetings provide key stakeholders, including FDA, patient advocates, researchers, drug developers, healthcare providers, and others, an opportunity to hear the patient’s voice. The lessons learned include but are not limited to specific experiences that matter most to patients, patient perspectives on meaningful treatment benefits and how patients want to be engaged in the drug development process.

FDA recognizes the value of gathering patient input through PFDD meetings and continues to host disease-specific PFDD meetings. More information on FDA-led PFDD meetings. More information on FDA-led PFDD meetings can be found below.

Links to meeting materials, including transcripts, webcast recordings, and presentation slides can be found below. Following each PFDD meeting, FDA summarized the input shared by patients and patient representatives in a Voice of the Patient report. The links to these summary reports can also be found below.

Click Below to Browse Disease Areas for FDA-Led PFDD Meetings

Upcoming FDA-led PFDD Meetings

FDA-led PFDD Meetings

Upcoming FDA-led PFDD Meetings

There are currently no upcoming FDA-led PFDD meetings.

FDA-led PFDD Meetings

Alopecia Areata

On September 11, 2017, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Alopecia Areata. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of alopecia areata on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Alpha-1 Antitrypsin

On September 29, 2015, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

On May 4, 2017, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Autism. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of autism on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Breast Cancer

On April 2, 2015, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Breast Cancer. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of Breast Cancer on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Chagas Disease

On April 28, 2015, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Chagas Disease. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of Chagas Disease on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis

On April 25, 2013, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Myalgic Encephalomyelitis on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Chronic Pain

On July 9, 2018, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Chronic Pain. FDA was interested in hearing patients’ perspectives on chronic pain, views on treatment approaches, and challenges or barriers to accessing treatments for chronic pain. FDA was particularly interested in hearing from patients who experience chronic pain that is managed with analgesic medications such as opioids, acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), antidepressants other medications and non-pharmacologic interventions or therapies.

Female Sexual Dysfunction

On October 27, 2014, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Female Sexual Dysfunction. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of Female Sexual Dysfunction on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Fibromyalgia

On March 26, 2014, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Fibromyalgia. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of Fibromyalgia on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

On May 11, 2015, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Hemophilia A, B, and Other Heritable Bleeding Disorders

On September 22, 2014, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Hemophilia A, B, and Other Heritable Bleeding Disorders. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of Hemophilia A, B, and Other Heritable Bleeding Disorders on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Hereditary Angioedema

On September 25, 2017, FDA is conducting a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Hereditary Angioedema. FDA is interested in obtaining patient and caregiver perspectives on the on the impact of Hereditary Angioedema on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

On June 14, 2013, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Huntington’s disease

On September 22, 2015, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Huntington’s Disease. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of Huntington’s Disease on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

On September 26, 2014, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Inborn Errors of Metabolism

On June 10, 2014, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Inborn Errors of Metabolism. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of Inborn Errors of Metabolism on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Lung Cancer

On June 28, 2013, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Lung Cancer. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of Lung Cancer on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

On September 24, 2013, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Narcolepsy. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of Narcolepsy on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Neuropathic Pain Associated with Peripheral Neuropathy

On June 10, 2016, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Neuropathic Pain Associated with Peripheral Neuropathy. FDA is interested in obtaining patient input on the impact of neuropathic pain associated with peripheral neuropathy on daily life and patients’ views on currently available therapies to treat the condition.

Non-tuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Infections

On October 15, 2015, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Non-tuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Infections. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of Non-tuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Infections on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Opioid Use Disorder

On April 17, 2018, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Opioid Use Disorder (OUD).In particular, FDA was interested in learning patients’ perspectives on OUD, including the effects on their health and well-being that have the greatest impact on daily life, their experience using prescription medical treatments and other treatments or therapies for OUD, and challenges or barriers to accessing or using medical treatments for OUD.

The audio recording of this meeting is publicly available using the links below. Because of the sensitive nature of the meeting topic, and the importance of gathering candid, meaningful input from individuals who have come forward to speak about living with opioid use disorder, there is no video recording of the meeting.

Parkinson’s Disease

On September 22, 2015, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Parkinson’s Disease. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of Parkinson’s Disease on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Patients Who Have Received an Organ Transplant

On September 27, 2016, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patients Who Have Received an Organ Transplant. FDA was interested in obtaining patient input on the impact of receiving an organ transplant on daily life and patients’ views on currently available therapies to manage organ transplantation.

On March 17, 2016, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Psoriasis. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of psoriasis on daily life, patient views on treatment approaches, and decision factors taken into account when selecting a treatment. FDA was interested in patient's perspectives for the types of psoriasis with primarily skin symptoms (such as plaque psoriasis, nail psoriasis, guttate psoriasis, etc.).

Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

On May 13, 2014, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

On April 6, 2017, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Sarcopenia. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the on the impact of sarcopenia on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Sickle Cell Disease

On February 7, 2014, FDA conducted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Sickle Cell Disease. FDA was interested in obtaining patient perspectives on the impact of Sickle Cell Disease on daily life and patient views on treatment approaches.

Stimulant Use Disorder

On October 6, 2020, FDA hosted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Stimulant Use Disorder. This meeting provided FDA the opportunity to obtain input from individuals with stimulant use disorder and other stakeholders on the impact of stimulant use disorder and views on treatment goals and approaches. FDA was interested in hearing perspectives from individuals with stimulant use disorder on the health effects and daily impacts of their stimulant use disorder, impact (if any) of opioid and polysubstance use on their stimulant use disorder, treatment goals, and decision factors considered when seeking out or selecting a treatment.

Systemic Sclerosis

On October 13, 2020, FDA hosted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Systemic Sclerosis. FDA was interested in hearing perspectives from individuals with systemic sclerosis on the health effects and daily impacts of their systemic sclerosis, treatment goals, and decision factors considered when seeking out or selecting a treatment.

On March 8, 2021, FDA hosted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Vitiligo. FDA was interested in hearing perspectives from individuals with vitiligo on the health effects and daily impacts of their vitiligo, treatment goals, and decision factors considered when seeking out or selecting a treatment.

To get updates about CDER's Patient-Focused Drug Development programs, subscribe to our free email subscription service using the button at the top of the page.


New York Knicks win fifth straight, longest streak in seven years

DALLAS -- Tom Thibodeau, the notoriously gruff first-year New York Knicks head coach, cracked a hint of a grin when asked about his demeanor following a 117-109 win Friday night over the Dallas Mavericks.

It was New York's fifth consecutive victory, marking the franchise's longest winning streak in seven years. The Knicks, who had a losing record and failed to make the playoffs in the previous seven seasons, are sixth in the Eastern Conference standings with a 30-27 record.

"Am I happy? You know I'm never happy," Thibodeau said. "We try not to get wrapped up in all of that stuff. I think you don't want to get lost, and that's the most important thing to understand what goes into winning. I think if we're taking care of all the little things, the big things take care of themselves.

"I think we have a belief that we can win, and that's probably the most important thing. It started that way in the beginning. It doesn't really matter what outside people think. It's what we think."

The Knicks went 545 games between five-game winning streaks, the second-longest stretch in franchise history behind a 653-game stretch from 1958 to '66, according to ESPN Stats & Information research.

"We've just got to keep building," said All-Star forward Julius Randle, who has averaged 30.2 points, 9.2 rebounds and 6.4 assists during the winning streak.

Randle, a Dallas native who had several friends and family members in the American Airlines Center crowd, continued perhaps the best stretch of his career with a dominant performance against the Mavericks. He finished with 44 points on 16-of-29 shooting, 10 rebounds and seven assists, becoming the first Knick to have at least 40 points, 10 rebounds and five assists in a game since Bernard King in a March 22, 1985 win.

"He's making winning plays," Thibodeau said. "The way we started the game, his aggressiveness set the tone. I've said it many times: He's our engine. He makes us go."

Randle has been especially dominant in the past three games, scoring 34 points in Monday's win over the Los Angeles Lakers, 32 in Wednesday's win over the New Orleans Pelicans and a season-high-tying 44 on Friday.

Knicks guard RJ Barrett said he thinks it's no coincidence that Randle played so well against his two previous teams and his hometown Mavs, who didn't pursue Randle in free agency twice when they had ample salary-cap space.

"The way they made the schedule -- Lakers, New Orleans and then in Dallas and New Orleans again -- I mean, you kind of knew he was going to come out and do this," said Barrett, who had 24 points and eight rebounds against the Mavs. "It doesn't surprise me at all. He's a tremendous player."

Thibodeau cited Randle's improved 3-point shooting as a key in his success this season, as the Most Improved Player candidate is shooting a career-best 41% from 3-point range after going 6-of-11 in Friday's win. Thibodeau also raved about Randle's commitment to offseason conditioning to prepare himself to carry such a major offensive burden for the Knicks.

"It's a responsibility, but it's not something that weighs on me or anything," Randle said. "It's just my approach and who I am. I just try to be the same every day -- not try to be too high or too low. I am who I am. Come in and work, put my hard hat on, try to be unselfish and play for my team. Let that dictate the results."


September 24, 2013 Day 248 of the Fifth Year - History

Are you seeking an education with a strong return on investment that will set you on the right career path? The Master of Science in Analytics (MSA) is a cost-effective program with rapid time to completion and a proven track record. Benchmark studies of starting salaries and placement rates show MSA student outcomes rival, if not surpass those of comparable programs at other leading universities. The ROI payback period is estimated to be two years on average.

Professional development and career services are an integral part of the MSA experience, including assistance with resume writing, interview and presentation skills, and professional networking. All career services are staffed and coordinated by the Institute and provided exclusively to MSA students. Dozens of employers visit the Institute each semester with the sole purpose of interviewing our students. Most job interviews are conducted on campus and arranged with the assistance of the Institute.

If becoming a data scientist is your aspiration, let your choice of where to study be a data-driven decision. The Institute was founded on a principle of transparency in providing prospective applicants with relevant data on student outcomes. We believe in letting the numbers speak for themselves. The employment report is a complete and carefully curated census of our annual placement results. It is published promptly upon graduation each year. We invite you to download the employment report and to inquire with any questions you may have about it.

EMPLOYERS MAKING OFFERS
Accenture AI
Agoda
Align Technology
Ally
American Express
Ankura
Bain & Company*
Banking Policy Institute
Beghou Consulting
Cherry Bekaert
Cigna
Cisco Systems
Coastal Cloud
Deloitte*
DISH Network
Dividend Finance
Duke Clinical Research Institute
Duke University
Elder Research
Elevate Credit*
EY*
Fidelity Investments*
Fifth Third Bank*
Food Bank of Eastern and Central NC
General Motors
GoDaddy
Guidehouse*
Hazen and Sawyer
IBM
John Deere
JPMorgan Chase*
KPMG
LendingTree*
Locus Biosciences
Martin Marietta
Mission Services
Ocean Media
Pendo*
Peraton
PwC
Q2 (PrecisionLender)
Red Hat
SAS*
Siemens Healthineers
State Farm
Target RWE/NoviSci
The Financial Risk Group*
The Home Depot*
TruDataRx
Truist*
University of California, San Francisco
VitalFlo
Wake Forest Baptist Health
Wellnecity
Wells Fargo
Bold denotes employers that succeeded in hiring one or more candidates, and (*) for employers that hired more than one candidate. The list does not include agencies of the federal government making conditional offers of employment.

Notes: Data with respect to salaries and bonuses are self-reported by graduates (without anonymity) and whenever possible verified by employers in cases where placement is arranged by the Institute (i.e., most candidates). Two graduates returned to prior employers. Two graduates will enter a paid, employer-sponsored training program for one year before entering regular full-time employment. All other job placements are full-time paid positions.

Data are made public here to guide prospective students and employers. Annual base salary figures do not include signing bonuses, relocation allowances or other forms of one-time compensation guaranteed upon signing. Conditional job offers (i.e., those requiring security clearance prior to employment) or other public sector employment are not included in salary data. As a STEM-qualified degree, international MSA graduates are eligible for Optional Practical Training (OPT). Commencement is typically held on the first Saturday in May.

DISCLAIMER: The Institute has a proven track record for placing graduates in the analytics profession, but it does not under any circumstance offer a guarantee of employment upon completion of the MSA degree.

Data Scientist Job Tracker

The following chart provides real-time data on the number of job postings in the U.S. for entry-level data scientists with salaries of $80,000 or higher posted in the past 30-days. While “data scientist” job openings are only a subset of a larger category of positions for which our students typically qualify (download the MSA Employment Report for more details), the data may provide a good barometer of the overall employment conditions for analytics professionals. It’s to be expected the trend in job postings will have seasonality.

Many articles written about the abundance of high-paying jobs for data scientists typically overestimate the number of openings by reporting all posted open positions. By restricting search queries to entry-level positions, recently posted (within 30-days), and with an expected salary level above $80,000 (M.S. or Ph.D. required), the data here provide a more accurate estimate of the employment market facing new graduates from masters programs. Our research shows that a naive query (without restrictions) will overestimate the number of open positions by a factor of ten. (See more data highlighting the employment market for data scientists.)

Annual Employment Report

Employment reports for each graduating class provide additional information about hiring employers and types of positions filled.


Japanese Crepe Frock

Japanese Crepe Frock
Price: $11.98

A thoroughly delightful 1920s style and a wonderful bargain in a summer frock of Japanese crepe. Artfully hand embroidered with silk floss on pockets and around neck. Narrow tie sash. Pearl buttons ornament front and fasten dress in back. Colors come in lavender, rose, or blue.

Price Basket

Since 2008 to 2020 each year we have created our own Inflation basket which includes a mix of 30 + items including food, goods and services, one of the many things it shows is inflation as measured by basic food and just 1 gallon of gas is vastly different compared with any government produced figures

1977 U.S.A. Alaska Oil Pipeline

1977 : The almost 800 miles long Trans Alaska Oil Pipeline is completed connecting oil fields in northern Alaska to the sea port of Valdez in the Gulf of Alaska in southern Alaska.

1988 Soviet Union (INF) Treaty

1988 : The Final Summit between President Reagan and President Gorbachev in Moscow on removing Intermediate Range Nuclear Missiles known as the (INF) Treaty ends with agreement on both sides.

1998 UK Spice Girls

1998 : Ginger Spice / Geri Halliwell announces she it to quit the popular Spice Girls over differences between other members of the group.

2000 Fiji Coup

2000 : A coup led by George Speight, an indigenous Fijian who is demanding the removal of ethnic Indians from senior government positions. Members of the coup are holding a number of hostages including the country's prime minister.

2008 Concerns Over Corn Crop in U.S. Corn Belt

2008 : Following an unusually late planting season in the rain-soaked Midwest Concerns over this years crop in the Corn Belt bring further fears that on top of the much increased cost of Gas causing inflationary pressures in the food chain, a poor crop this year could further impact food prices and inflationary pressures in the US.

2012 Canada Interpol Hunt Canadian Killer

2012 : Interpol has added Luke Rocco Magnotta, suspected killer, to their most wanted list. Magnotta is suspected of murdering Jun Lin, a Chinese student who was possibly in a relationship with him, and sending body parts of the victim to political party offices in Ottawa. Magnotta had fled Canada was found by police in Berlin and was taken into custody on June 4th.

2013 Syrian President Warns Israel

2013 : Syrian president Bashar al-Assad, accused of using chemical weapons against rebel forces, has warned the country of Israel against any future air strikes. Assad stated that works on a contract to supply air defense missiles was underway and in response Israel stated that if the defense missiles were used it would attack. Israel had been conducting air strikes in the country in an effort to stop weapons being sent to Hezbollah in Lebanon.

Popular Music from the 1950s, Genres including Rock 'n' Roll, Traditional Pop, Country, Rhythm & Blues, top songs and artists from each year Includes a description of each Genre and the top performers and songs for each year in the Fifties


Paris Weather for September 2020

What's the Weather like in Paris in September

Temperature

The weather begins to cool down in Paris, France in September, when the autumn season is just around the corner. The average temperature for this month starts off at 17.5°C on September 1 st and drops down to 14.5°C by September 30 th , compared to October, which has an average temprature of around 14°C dropping to 9.5°C over the course of the month.

Daily highs decrease from 22°C to 19°C across the month, almost never exceeding 27°C or falling under 14°C. Daily low temperatures follow a similar pattern and fall from 13°C to 10°C, going under 6°C or rising above 16°C only one day out of every ten.

In recent times, the highest temperature which has ever been recorded for Paris in September is 32°C, with the lowest temperature ever recorded for this month being 2°C. When you compare these temperatures to the average for the month 16°C it's clear that they're the extremes and aren't what you should expect to experience during your holiday.

Overall, the hottest month in 2013 was September, when the average daily high temperature was 21°C. Relative to the average, the hottest day of the year was September 5 th , which had a high temperature of 33°C that's 11°C higher than the average.

Paris is subject to an average of 16mm of rainfall throughout September, making it one of the driest months of the year. Despite the small amount of rain, with some type of precipitation falling on 11 days throughout the month, there is a good chance you'll experience a shower or two. It's better to be safe than sorry so make sure you pack an umbrella or waterproof coat before you travel.

Moderate rain is the most common type of rainfall for the month and tends to occur around September 30 th . This is followed by thunderstorms which are most likely around September 1 st and light rain which is generally expected around September 29 th .

The probability of rainfall increases slightly as the month progresses, with the likelihood of rainfall rising from 43% on September 1 st up to 49% by September 30 th . Even though autumn is starting to set in during September, this month is only affected by foggy conditions on less than one day and snow is practically unheard of.

Average Sea Temperature

The average sea temperature for Paris' closest coastal location in September is 17°C that's slightly cooler than in August. This temperature is considered to be cool by most people, but hardy swimmers should be able to enjoy a dip without feeling too chilly.

The average daily humidity for September is around 71%, created by highs of up to 96% and lows down to 49%. In 2013, the least humid month of the year was September which had an average daily low humidity of 57%.

Average Sunshine Hours

Across September, Paris enjoys an average of eight hours of sunshine each day, providing you with ample opportunities to get outside and explore. Throughout the month, the sunshine and daylight hours both decrease, with the length of the day shortening by one hour and 43 minutes between September 1 st and September 30 th .

Throughout the month, wind speeds tend to fluctuate between 1 m/s and 6 m/s, very rarely going over 9 m/s. The lowest average wind speed of 3 m/s usually happens around September 25 th , when the average daily maximum wind speed is 6 m/s.

On the other hand, the highest average wind speed of 4 m/s often occurs around September 4 th , when the average daily maximum wind speed is 6 m/s. In 2013, the least windy month of the year was September, which had an average wind speed of 3 m/s.

You can check the forecast here.

Paris Hotels in September

Le Relais Montmartre

Within easy walking distance of the Moulin Rouge, Butte Montmartre, Sacré Coeur and the Place du Tertre, Le Relais Montmartre is an ideal base from which to explore. Here you'll find 26 harmoniously decorated rooms divided between classic, comfort and superior categories.

Each guestroom features free WiFi access, LCD TV, air conditioning and private bathroom with shower and hairdryer. Superior rooms are significantly larger and come with bathroom with shower and bath.

Onsite services and facilities include breakfast buffet served in the dining room, terrace or your guestroom, free WiFi access throughout and public parking. Small pets are also allowed here.

Hotel du Printemps

For something a bit more affordable, check out the Hotel du Printemps. This two-star boutique hotel provides budget accommodation just a short walk away from Place de la Nation in a typically Parisian district, close to several cafes, shops, restaurants and outdoor markets.

Here guests can choose between single, standard double/twin, superior double/twin and triple rooms, each of which features flat-screen TV, air conditioning, free WiFi access and private bathroom with hairdryer.

Onsite services and facilities include free WiFi access throughout, library, breakfast buffet served in the dining room, bar-lounge which opens out onto a terrace and paid public parking nearby.

Acacias Etoile Hotel

For a shopping-based holiday in Paris, consider staying at the Acacias Etoile Hotel. Located in one of the liveliest districts of the city, only steps away from the Champs Elysees, this three-star hotel provides accommodation in the shape of singles, standard doubles and club doubles.

Each guestroom features flat-screen satellite TV, air conditioning, tea/coffee making facilities, free WiFi access and private bathroom with hairdryer and complimentary toiletries. Club rooms are larger and come with courtyard views and bathrooms with both showers and baths.

Within the hotel you'll find continental breakfast served in the dining room or your guestroom, bar, garden and public parking nearby. Children under 12 years old enjoy breakfast for free when staying with adults.

Best Western Hotel Faubourg Saint-Martin

The three-star Best Western Hotel Faubourg Saint-Martin is found in the heart of pedestrian Paris, close to the Gare de l'Est, Gare du Nord, Passage Brady and Porte de Saint Martin. This hotel offers a home-away-from-home experience and provides accommodation in the form of comfort, executive, prestige and family rooms.

Each guestroom features air conditioning, free WiFi access, flat-screen TV, Nespresso coffee machine and private bathroom with rain shower and complimentary toiletries.

Onsite services and amenities include free WiFi access throughout, continental breakfast buffet served in the dining room or your guestroom, 24-hour bar-lounge, room service and paid private parking nearby.

Hotel des Nations St-Germain

If you want to stay in the Latin Quarter during your holiday in Paris, take a look at the Hotel des Nations St-Germain. Found just 15 minutes away from Notre Dame, this three-star hotel features modern and brightly-coloured single, twin and double rooms.

Each guestroom features air conditioning, satellite TV, tea/coffee making facilities, free WFi access and private white-tiled bathroom with complimentary toiletries and hairdryer. Within the hotel you'll find continental breakfast buffet served in the dining room, tea and coffee available at reception, free WiFi access throughout and paid public parking nearby.

The hotel is located on one of the oldest streets in Paris and is just a two-minute walk away from the nearest metro station which you can use to access Opéra Garnier and the Louvre.

Restaurants and Bars

Blueberry Maki Bar

For those wanting to experience delectable sushi in Paris, head to Blueberry Maki Bar located close to the Saint Sulpice Metro stop. The maki and sushi dishes here are bursting with colour and flavour, and with an outstanding freshness.

This eaterie can get rather busy however, staff are always very friendly and accommodating. The tuna maki is sublime, as well as the Japanese desserts which often change but have included dishes such as black sesame parfait with chocolate and raspberry. The Mochi ice creams are always on the menu, and definitely worth a try!

Wine by One in the Champs-Elysees area is a fabulous venue to explore the exquisite wines the city has to offer. This bar runs by a unique concept where you are given a card which you can add money to, then use this card to help yourself to the vast array of wines behind glass display cases. Opt for a sip, 100ml, 200ml or large glass. Small dishes are also available as well as cheese and charcuterie boards.

Things to do in Paris in September

Notre Dame Cathedral

Notre Dame Cathedral is one of the most famous attractions in France. This historic Catholic cathedral is located in the 4th arrondissement in Paris and is best known for its French Gothic architecture, specifically the naturalism of its sculptures and the stained glass windows. The best time to visit the landmark is on a sunny day when you can see the sun shining through the impressive stained glass windows.

The best way to make the most of your visit is by signing up for one of the many guided tours or by purchasing one of the low-cost guide books at the entrance and touring around the cathedral yourself.

St. Etienne du Mont

Another religious attraction worthy of a visit is St. Etienne du Mont. This 16 th century cathedral is often quieter and less-visited than many others in Paris, which gives it a more tranquil and holy atmosphere.

Located in the 5th arrondissement, just a short walk away from the Pantheon, St Etienne du Mont boasts amazing architecture both on the outside and inside, with intricate stonework, arches, staircases, artwork and stained glass windows which are found at the far end.

Some of the highlights of the cathedral include a shrine dedicated to St Geneviève, the patron saint of Paris, the tombs of Blaise Pascal and Jean Racine and the body of Jean-Paul Marat who is buried in the cathedral's cemetery.

Rue Montorgueil

When it comes to souvenir shopping and gift buying, you can't beat Rue Montorgueil. This pedestrian district is best known for its cafes, pastry shops, bakeries and wine bars. Rue Montorgueil is also known for its foodie shop section, packed with chocolate shops, kitchenware stores and sweet boutiques where you can get your hands on almost anything kitchen-related you can imagine.

If you're looking to bag a bargain, you'll also find restaurant supply shops where you can get your hands on all sorts of foodie treats for the lowest prices available here.

Musée Jacquemart-Andre

If the September weather takes a turn for the worst, seek shelter inside the Musée Jacquemart-Andre. This attraction is set inside a mansion which was built in the 19 th century and is packed with apartments and rooms where you can admire the period furniture, explore a garden overflowing with sculptures, wander around a museum full of Italian art, find some presents at the gift shop and relax in the café.

If you really want to learn all there is to know about the items on display, it's worth downloading the museum apps before you go and picking up a free audio guide when you arrive. For children aged between seven and 12, there is also a kids' activity booklet available, full of games, puzzles and pictures, to help them learn about and understand the artwork, too.

Montparnasse 56

When it comes to unbeatable views, Montparnasse 56 is the very best place in Paris. This tower stretches on for 689 feet in the air and is the city's only skyscraper. Peppered amongst its 59 floors you'll find an interactive panorama, gift shop, numerous restaurants, terrace and the panoramic floor.

The most popular section is the panoramic floor which is located on the 56 th floor. On this floor you can also learn about what you're looking at with the help of interactive panels, admire the permanent exhibition about the history of the building and take the various quizzes about what you can see from the lookout points.

If you're feeling brave, you can climb the stairs from the panoramic floor to the open roof-top terrace where you can enjoy unparalleled vistas which stretch on for miles across the city.

Whilst the view is wonderful during the day, the best time to visit is without a doubt after sunset, when the city bursts into life with twinkling lights and you can watch the Eiffel Tower light show.


September 24, 2013 Day 248 of the Fifth Year - History

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Readings

First: Amos 8:4-7 - A message against those who suppress the poor for their own gain: the Lord will not forget a single thing you have done.

Psalm: 112 - Praise the Lord who raises the poor / Praise O servants of the Lord / High above all nations is the Lord / From the dust he lifts the lowly .

Second: I Timothy 2:1-8 - There should be prayers offered to God for everyone - God wants everyone to be saved and reach full knowledge of the truth. There is only one God, and one mediator, Jesus

Gospel: Luke 16:1-13 - Parable of the dishonest / unjust steward: the children of the world are more astute in dealing with their own kind than are the children of light. . The one who can be trusted in little things can be trusted in great ones: if you cannot be trusted with money, who will trust you with genuine riches? You cannot be the slave of both God and money.


The fourth wave of feminism: meet the rebel women

T he campaign for women's liberation never went away, but this year a new swell built up and broke through. Since the early summer, I've been talking to feminist activists and writers for a short book, All The Rebel Women, and as I tried to keep up with the protests, marches and talks, my diary became a mess of clashing dates. The rush was such that in a single weekend in October, you could have attended a feminist freshers' fair in London, the North East Feminist Gathering in Newcastle, a Reclaim the Night march in Edinburgh, or a discussion between different generations of feminist activists at the British Library (this sold out in 48 hours, was moved to a room four times bigger, and sold out again).

You could have joined one of the country's 149 local grassroots groups, or shared your experience of misogyny on the site Laura Bates, 27, started in April 2012. Her Everyday Sexism Project has proved so successful that it was rolled out to 17 countries on its first anniversary this year, tens of thousands of women worldwide writing about the street harassment, sexual harassment, workplace discrimination and body-shaming they encounter. The project embodies that feminist phrase "the personal is political", a consciousness-raising exercise that encourages women to see how inequality affects them, proves these problems aren't individual but collective, and might therefore have political solutions. This year, 6,000 stories that have been sent to the project about harassment or assault on public transport – the majority never reported to authorities – were used to train 2,000 police officers in London, and create a public awareness campaign. In its first few weeks, says Bates, the reporting of harassment on public transport soared. Everyday Sexism currently has more than 108,000 followers on Twitter. Of course, following a social media account isn't the same as joining a political party, but to put this engagement in perspective, Tory membership is now at 134,000.

Welcome to the fourth wave of feminism. This movement follows the first-wave campaign for votes for women, which reached its height 100 years ago, the second wave women's liberation movement that blazed through the 1970s and 80s, and the third wave declared by Rebecca Walker, Alice Walker's daughter, and others, in the early 1990s. That shift from second to third wave took many important forms, but often felt broadly generational, with women defining their work as distinct from their mothers'. What's happening now feels like something new again. It's defined by technology: tools that are allowing women to build a strong, popular, reactive movement online. Just how popular is sometimes slightly startling. Girlguiding UK introduced a campaigning and activism badge this year and a summer survey of Mumsnet users found 59% consider themselves feminists, double those who don't. Bates says that, for her, modern feminism is defined by pragmatism, inclusion and humour. "I feel like it is really down-to-earth, really open," she says, "and it's very much about people saying: 'Here is something that doesn't make sense to me, I thought women were equal, I'm going to do something about it.'"

As 2013 unfolded, it became impossible to ignore the rumble of feminist campaigners, up and down the country. They gathered outside the Bank of England in early July, the first burst of a heatwave, dressed as aviators, suffragettes and warrior queens, organised by Caroline Criado-Perez, 29, shouting for women's representation on bank notes and beyond.

Campaigners from Object and Turn Your Back On Page 3 protest outside the offices of the Sun. Photograph: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images

They demonstrated outside the Sun headquarters, organised by Yas Necati, 17, in a protest against Page 3, the biggest image of a woman that appears each day in the country's biggest-selling newspaper – a teenager or twentysomething smiling sunnily in her pants. Necati, a student at sixth-form college, laughed shyly as she told me about the mocked-up pages she has sent Sun editor David Dinsmore, suggesting feminist comedians, artists and writers to appear on the page instead. One of her favourites showed a woman flashing bright blue armpit hair. The the No More Page 3 petition started by Lucy-Anne Holmes, 37, in August 2012,, has been signed by 128,000 people.

Ikamara Larasi, 24, started heading a campaign to address racist and sexist stereotypes in music videos, just as students began banning summer hit Blurred Lines on many UK campuses, in response to its sexist lyrics. Jinan Younis, 18, co-founded a feminist society at school, experienced online abuse from some boys in her peer group – "feminism and rape are both ridiculously tiring," they wrote – and wasn't deterred. Instead, she wrote an article about it that went viral. When I spoke to her in September, she was juggling shifts in a call centre, babysitting for neighbours, preparing for university, while helping out with a campaign to encourage feminist societies in schools countrywide. UK Feminista, an organisation set up in 2010 to support feminist activists, has had 100 people contact them this year, wanting to start their own school group. In late August, their national day of action against lads' mags included 19 protests across the UK.

Thousands more feminists raised their voices online. Bates and Soraya Chemaly, 47, were among those who set up a campaign against misogynist pages on Facebook, including groups with names such as "raping a pregnant bitch and telling your friends you had a threesome". Supporters sent more than 60,000 tweets in the course of a swift, week-long push, convincing the social media behemoth to change its moderation policies.

Southall Black Sisters protested outside the offices of the UK Border Agency against racist immigration laws and propaganda – including the notorious "Go Home" vans. They also marched in solidarity with protesters in Delhi, who began a wave of demonstrations following the death of a woman who was gang raped in the city last December, protests against rape culture that soon spread to Nepal, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. The African LGBTI Out & Proud Diamond Group demonstrated opposite Downing Street after allegations emerged of the sexual abuse of women held at Yarl's Wood immigration removal centre.

Lucy-Anne Holmes, founder of the No More Page 3 campaign.

The Fawcett Society continued to show how cuts to benefits, services and public-sector jobs pose "triple jeopardy" to women (in 2013 women's unemployment reached a 26-year high). Rape Crisis South London spearheaded a successful campaign to criminalise the possession of pornography that depicts rape. And 40 Days of Choice challenged the anti-abortion campaigners who have become worryingly prominent in the UK recently.

The Edinburgh fringe hosted a surprising run of feminist comedians, including Mary Bourke, with her show Muffragette. Bourke memorably noted in a BBC interview this summer that the open-mic circuit has become a "rape circle" in recent years. Feminist standups were ready to respond. Nadia Kamil, 29, performed a set including a feminist burlesque, peeling off eight layers of clothing to reveal messages such as "pubes are normal" and "equal pay" picked out in sequins. She also explained the theory of intersectionality through a vocoder, and gave out badges with the slogan "Smash the Kyriarchy". (She hoped audience members would look up any words they were unfamiliar with later, such as "kyriarchy" and "cis".)

Bridget Christie, 42, won the Foster's Edinburgh comedy award with A Bic for Her, in which she railed against sexist comments by racing driver Stirling Moss, and talked about "ethical filing" – taking sexist magazines off shop shelves and dumping them straight in the bin. She wasn't encouraging other people to do this, she emphasised. She just wanted to point out that she had been doing it for months – months – with no problem at all.

Women marched through London for Million Women Rise and Reclaim the Night, and organised events in 207 countries for One Billion Rising, a day of demonstrations to highlight the UN statistic that one in three women will be raped or beaten in her lifetime. As part of this event, the UK parliament debated whether sex and relationship education should be on the national curriculum, and six months later, in her summer holidays, Lili Evans, 16, started the Campaign4Consent with Necati, calling for consent education in schools.

A chorus rose against online misogyny. Criado-Perez highlighted the string of rape threats sent to her on Twitter, writer Lindy West published the comments she received, ("There is a group of rapists with over 9,000 penises coming for this fat bitch," read one), and the academic and broadcaster Mary Beard, Lauren Mayberry from the band Chvrches, and Ruby Tandoh from The Great British Bake Off, all spoke out on this issue. If you want to know how deeply some people resent the idea of women's advancement, the stream of online misogyny has been perhaps the most obvious, ugly backlash yet.

But bald attempts to silence women only made the movement larger and louder. They convinced those who had never thought about misogyny before that it was clearly still alive, and convinced those who were well aware of it to keep going.

When Nimko Ali, 29, spoke out against female genital mutilation, with her group, Daughters of Eve, she received death threats. She kept speaking strongly, wittily, discussing both her own experience of FGM and her "fanny forward" list of supporters, putting an issue long marginalised firmly on the political agenda. In November, Alison Saunders, the new Director of Public Prosecutions, suggested she expected the first prosecution for FGM to happen in the UK fairly soon.

Some of those leading the biggest campaigns, including Bates, only started calling themselves feminists in the last few years, which shows how nascent this wave is. Larasi bursts out laughing when I ask if she has always considered herself a feminist. "Definitely not," she says. She has been working at the black women's organisation Imkaan for three or four years, and was raised by a feminist mother, but it was only last year that she started using the term to describe herself. She began identifying specifically as a black feminist in February 2013. This means she doesn't feel she has to "pick a side", she says, between the movements for women's rights and for racial equality, and she is now a member of the thriving Black Feminists group in London – there is also one in Manchester.

Feminist comedian Nadia Kamil at this year's Edinburgh fringe festival. Photograph: Scott Campbell/Getty Images

The majority of activists I speak to define themselves as intersectional feminists – or say they try to live up to this decription – and when I mention this to Kimberlé Crenshaw, the US law professor who coined the term intersectionality in 1989, she's genuinely surprised. The theory concerns the way multiple oppressions intersect, and although, as Crenshaw says, it can be interpreted in a wild variety of ways, today's feminists generally seem to see it as an attempt to elevate and make space for the voices and issues of those who are marginalised, and a framework for recognising how class, race, age, ability, sexuality, gender and other issues combine to affect women's experience of discrimination. Younis considers intersectionality the overriding principle for today's feminists, and Ali says she constantly tries to check her privilege, to recognise how hierarchies of power are constructed.

There are women and men of all ages involved in this movement – at a Lose the Lads' mags protest in York, for instance, I met an activist who had been at the women's liberation conference in 1978. But many of those at the forefront are in their teens and 20s, and had their outlook formed during decades in which attitudes to women were particularly confusing.

They grew up being told the world was post-feminist, that sexism and misogyny were over, and feminists should pack up their placards. At the same time, women in the public eye were often either sidelined or sexualised, represented in exactly the same way as they had been in the 70s, albeit beneath a thin veil of irony. Finn Mackay says when she started the London Feminist Network in 2004, the two main issues motivating those who joined were the massive growth of the beauty industry, and "pornification" – the infiltration of pornographic imagery into the mainstream via Playboy-branded pencil cases, for instance, and the trend for pubic waxes. Those concerns have continued, and help explain the focus of many current feminist campaigns, which address the wallpaper of women's lives, the everyday sexism – lads' mags, Page 3, rape pages on Facebook, cosmetic surgery advertising – and calls for positive representation on bank notes and in broadcasting.

But the feminist consciousness of the fourth wave has also been forged through the years of the financial crash and the coalition government, and many activists have been politicised and influenced by other movements, particularly the student campaign against fees, but also the wider campaign against cuts and the Occupy movement. The quick, reactive nature of many of the feminist campaigns cropping up today reflects the work of activists more generally in a biting world of unemployment and under-employment, workfare, zero-hours contracts, bedroom taxes, damaging rhetoric against immigrants, the disabled and those who need support from the state.

Caroline Criado-Perez leads a protest outside the Bank of England to see a woman back on our bank notes. Photograph: Sean Smith for the Guardian

With so many pressing issues, feminists are fighting on several fronts, and the campaigns of the past few years have often been started by individuals or small groups, who have responded to issues they feel strongly about, and can usefully address. Holmes and Necati both grew up with the Sun at home, which has shaped their opposition to Page 3. Criado-Perez was outraged by all-male discussions of teenage pregnancy and breast cancer treatment on the Today programme, so set up a database of female experts, The Women's Room, with Catherine Smith in 2012. In the first three days of that year, seven women were killed by men, and Karen Ingala Smith, chief executive of the charity Nia, started counting the toll of misogynist murders. Her Counting Dead Women project puts names and stories to the statistics we often hear, and is asking the government to take an integrated approach to understanding violence against women.

There are, of course, differences of opinion when it comes to which subjects feminism should be addressing. How could there not be, in a movement that represents half the population, and aims for liberation for all? But what's exciting about these individual campaigns is the way they're building a movement capable of taking on structural, systemic problems. As the philosopher Nina Power notes, there are teenage girls today, growing up with Twitter and Tumblr, who have a perfect grasp of feminist language and concepts, who are active on a huge range of issues – some of those I talk to are starting to work on economic analyses of women's predicament, the ways in which neo-liberal policies such as the rolling back of the state and low taxes for the rich, have shaped modern inequalities.

The movement's concerns are forever shifting, and will likely do so powerfully when some of today's young activists encounter the pay gap, childcare costs and pregnancy discrimination in their own lives. "What is it going to be like," says Power, "to have this generation of people who are totally attuned to all these terms and categories and thinking through all these issues from a very young age?" Brought up to know they are equal to men, fourth-wave feminists are pissed off when they're not treated as such, but have more than enough confidence to shout back. Misogynists, watch out.


2013 Boss 302 Mustang

Ford’s Boss 302 Mustang, which returned to the Mustang lineup for the 2012 model year, was set to complete its two-year run in 2013. The most notable change for the new year was a hockey stick graphics package. Featuring reflective stripes, the package was reminiscent of those found on the 1970 Boss 302.


Watch the video: Lesemonat August. 2021 (May 2022).