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Pavlic APD-70 - History

Pavlic APD-70 - History


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Pavlic
(APD-70: dp. 1,370; 1. 306'; b. 37'; dr. 12'7"; s. 24 k.; epl.
374; a. 1 5", 6 40mm.; cl. Amesbury)

Pavlie (APD-70) was laid down as DE-669 21 September 1943 by the Dravo Corp., Neville Island, Pittsburgh, Penn.; launched 18 December 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Milton F. Pavlie; completed by the Consolidated Steel Corp. of Orange, Tex.; redesignated APD-70 on 27 June 1944; and commissioned 29 December 1944, Lt. Comdr. C. V. Allen, USNR, in command.

After shakedown out of Bermuda and amphibious training at Portsmouth, Va., Pavlic departed Norfolk 22 February for Hawaii via the Panama Canal and San Diego arriving Pearl Harbor 21 March. Following training exercises, she departed Pearl Harbor 13 April and steamed via Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands and Ulithi, Caroline Islands for the Ryukyus.

From 3 May to 9 May she was stationed on the picket line off Okinawa fighting off several raids and performing rescue work. On the 10th, she escorted Relief (AH-1) to Guam, returning to Hagushi Anehorage two days later to resume patrol work.

On 18 May Pavlic was designated as a special rescue vessel and continued her rescue work while undergoing several heavy enemy raids.

On 27 May, she repelled her first direct suicide attank. On 28 May, she opened fire on a low flying "Betty", a Japanese torpedo bomber, which veered away. Then the fast transport and Yokes (APD 69) picked up survivors from Dre~cler (DD741), sunk by two suicide planes, and took them to Hagushi Anehorage. On 29 May she picked up survivors from Shubrick (DD-639), also damaged by a suicide plane.

For the remainder of the war she continued to serve in the Pacific war zone, primarily in the Ryukyus. On 14 August she got underway to join the 3rd Fleet off Tokyo. Four days later she made rendezvous with the British Pacific Fleet, and took on board a Royal Navy and Royal Marine landing force from HMS Newfoundland and HMNZS Gambia. On 27 August Pavlic arrived Honshu, Japan, entering Sagami Wan, in the shadow of Mount Fujiyama, and on the 30th she steamed into Tokyo Bay with Sims (APD-50) and Barr (APD-39) and debarked landing forces to demilitarize Forts No. 2 and 4, guarding the entrance to Tokyo Bay and to raise the colors. The landing forces returned, and Pavlic proceeded to Yokosuka

On 31 August, with L Company of the 4th Marines embarked, Pavlic made the short run to Tateyama Wan to secure the large Japanese naval air station and remained there until 3 September supporting the Marines. On that day, after an Army Occupation Regiment relieved them, she reembarked
the Marines and returned to Yokosuka Ko. On 9 September, Pavlic was designated as a barracks ship.

On 15 April 1946 Pavlic sailed for the United States and after overhaul at the Philadelphia and Charleston naval shipyards, was towed to Green Cove Springs, Fla., where she decommissioned 15 November 1946. She was struck from the Navy List 1 April 1967 and was sold for scrapping to North American Smelting Co. 1 July 1968.

Pavlic received one battle star for World War II service.


MILTON F. PAVLIC, LCDR, USN

A new star appeared in our heavens four years ago—not a real star, but just Milton from the constellation Rittman. In finding his way here he followed no gravitational law, but simply drifted in. Western Reserve University with its chemistry, biology, and other pre-medical bores made him decide that breaking bones must be more fun than mending them. This idea, backed by others of more patriotic origin, won the day for the Navy and here he is.

"A vigorous youth, with lots of dash, daring, and dexterity." This phrase sums up his outward characteristics. It tells why his roommate suffers with envy every time the mail comes and why he dons his monkey jacket as a matter of routine on Saturday nights. The dexterity part explains the existence of a number of rather strangely constructed but useful articles in his room. These are products of an inborn desire to invent which often crops out in spare moments. In spite of these drawbacks, Milton sails smoothly through academics without a care and never a moment in the ranks of the wooden.

Plebe Fencing Class Swimming Juice Gang 1 P.O.

MILTON FRANK PAVLIC

A new star appeared in our heavens four years ago—not a real star, but just Milton from the constellation Rittman. In finding his way here he followed no gravitational law, but simply drifted in. Western Reserve University with its chemistry, biology, and other pre-medical bores made him decide that breaking bones must be more fun than mending them. This idea, backed by others of more patriotic origin, won the day for the Navy and here he is.

"A vigorous youth, with lots of dash, daring, and dexterity." This phrase sums up his outward characteristics. It tells why his roommate suffers with envy every time the mail comes and why he dons his monkey jacket as a matter of routine on Saturday nights. The dexterity part explains the existence of a number of rather strangely constructed but useful articles in his room. These are products of an inborn desire to invent which often crops out in spare moments. In spite of these drawbacks, Milton sails smoothly through academics without a care and never a moment in the ranks of the wooden.

Plebe Fencing Class Swimming Juice Gang 1 P.O.

Milton was lost on November 15, 1942 when USS South Dakota (BB 57) was damaged by Japanese surface gunfire during the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal.

His wife was listed as next of kin.


Contents

USS Pavlic (DE-669) was laid down as a Buckley-class destroyer escort on 21 September 1943 by the Dravo Corporation at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Named for Lieutenant Commander Milton Frank Pavlic, who was assigned aboard the new battleship USS South Dakota when she commissioned 20 March 1942. South Dakota sailed to the Pacific where her battle group engaged a force of Japanese warships. She was badly damaged in the action. Lt. Comdr. Pavlic died in the battle and was posthumously was awarded the Purple Heart Medal. Ώ]

USS Pavlic was launched 18 December 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Milton F. Pavlic. After launching, USSPalvic was towed to Orange, Texas, for fitting out at the Consolidated Shipbuilding Company shipyard. After a six-month long conversion, USS Pavlic was reclassified as a Charles Lawrence-class and was renamed USS Pavlic APD-70 on 27 June 1944. After her conversion, she was re-commissioned at Orange, Texas on 29 December 1944, with Lieutenant Commander C. V. Allen, USNR, in command. Ώ]


Pavlic APD-70 - History

From: DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN NAVAL FIGHTING SHIPS, Vol. V, pp. 237-38.

Milton Frank Pavlic, born in Trieste Italy, 27 December 1909, was appointed Midshipman 25 June 1928, and commissioned Ensign 2 June 1932, and Lieutenant Commander 15 June 1942. He served in New York , Mississippi , Tracy , Melville , and Barney . From 17 June 1940 to 9 March 1942, he served at the Naval Academy then helped fit out South Dakota and was on board the battleship when she commissioned 20 March 1942. South Dakota sailed to the Pacific and fought in the Santa Cruz Islands, and at Guadalcanal. In the fierce Naval Battle off Guadalcanal early on 15 November, South Dakota's Task Force engaged a force of Japanese warships. She was badly damaged in the action. Lt. Comdr. Pavlic died in the battle and posthumously was awarded the Purple Heart Medal.

(APD-70: dp. 1,370 l. 306' b. 37' dr. 12'7" s. 24 k. cpl. 374 a. 1 5", 6 40mm. cl. Amesbury )

Pavlic (APD-70) was laid down as DE-669 21 September 1943 by the Dravo Corp., Neville Island, Pittsburgh, Penn. launched 18 December 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Milton F. Pavlic completed by the Consolidated Steel Corp. of Orange Tex. redesignated A PD-70 on 27 June 1944 and commissioned 29 December 1944, Lt. Comdr. C. V. Allen, USNR, in command.

After shakedown out of Bermuda and amphibious training at Portsmouth, Va., Pavlic departed Norfolk 22 February for Hawaii via the Panama Canal and San Diego arriving Pearl Harbor 21 March. Following training exercises, she departed Pearl Harbor 13 April a nd steamed via Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands and Ulithi, Caroline Islands for the Ryukyus.

From 3 May to 9 May she was stationed on the picket line off Okinawa fighting off several raids and performing rescue work. On the 10th, she escorted Relief (AH-1) to Guam, returning to Hagushi Anchorage two days later to resume patrol work.

On 18 May Pavlic was designated as a special rescue vessel and continued her rescue work while undergoing several heavy enemy raids.

On 27 May, she repelled her first direct suicide attack. On 28 May, she opened fire on a low flying "Betty", a Japanese torpedo bomber, which veered away. Then the fast transport and Yokes (APD-69) picked up survivors from Drexler (DD-741), sunk by two suicide planes, and took them to Hagushi Anchorage. On 29 May she picked up survivors from Shubrick (DD-639), also damaged by a suicide plane.

For the remainder of the war she continued to serve in the Pacific war zone, primarily in the Ryukyus. On 14 August she got underway to join the 3rd Fleet off Tokyo. Four days later she made rendezvous with the British Pacific Fleet, and took on board a R oyal Navy and Royal Marine landing force from HMS Newfoundland and HMNZS Gambia . On 27 August Pavlic arrived Honshu, Japan, entering Sagami Wan, in the shadow of Mount Fujiyama, and on the 30th she steamed into Tokyo Bay with Sims (APD-50) and Barr (APD-39), and debarked landing forces to demilitarize Forts No. 2 and 4, guarding the entrance to Tokyo Bay and to raise the colors. The landing forces returned, and Pavlic proceeded to Yokosuka Ko.

On 31 August, with L Company of the 4th Marines embarked, Pavlic made the short run to Tateyama Wan to secure the large Japanese naval air station and remained there until 3 September supporting the Marines. On that day, after an Army Occupation Re giment relieved them, she reembarked

the Marines and returned to Yokosuka Ko. On 9 September, Pavlic was designated as a barrack ships.

On 15 April 1946 Pavlic sailed for the United States and, after overhaul at the Philadelphia and Charleston naval shipyards, was towed to Green Cove Springs, Fla., where she decommissioned 15 November 1946. She was struck from the Navy List 1 Apri l 1967 and was sold for scrapping to North American Smelting Co. 1 July 1968.


Pavlic APD-70 - History

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Pavlic APD-70 - History

Marines go ashore for initial occupation of Japanese facilities, probably near Yokosuka, circa 30 August 1945. Taken by a USS Iowa (BB-61) photographer. Credit: Naval Historical Center.

General of the Army Douglas MacArthur, U.S. Army (second from right) with other senior Army officers, upon his arrival at Atsugi airdrome, near Tokyo, Japan, 30 August 1945. Among those present are: Major General Joseph M. Swing, Commanding General, 11th Airborne Division, (left) Lieutenant General Richard K. Sutherland (3rd from right) General Robert L. Eichelberger (right). Aircraft in the background is a Douglas C-54. Credit: Naval Historical Center.

Brigadier General William T. Clement, USMC (left), Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, USN (center) and Admiral William F. Halsey, USN (right) Go over plans at the Yokosuka Naval Hospital, which had been taken over for treatment of released Allied prisoners of war, 30 August 1945. Credit: Naval Historical Center.

U.S. Marines destroying rifles, light field guns and other weapons at Futtsu-misaki, on Tokyo Bay across from Yokosuka Navy Base, in a first step toward disarming Japan, 30 August 1945. Initial landings had taken place on that day. Credit: Naval Historical Center.

Hump Express - August 30, 1945

US Army General MacArthur Arrives at Atsugi Airfield, August 30, 1945, and speaks to American and Japanese reporters. Standing behind General MacArthur, at right, is General Robert L. Eichelberger. When President Truman announced Japan's capitulation, he placed General of the Army Douglas MacArthur in charge of the surrender and occupation of Japan, under the title Supreme Commander Allied Powers (SCAP). Though the first two weeks of this mission were directed from Manila, on August 30 MacArthur flew to Japan. Without escort and only armed with sidearms, his small party wondered if they would be killed or captured upon landing, but MacArthur was confident the Japanese were genuine in their surrender and the mission would be welcomed. Arriving at Atsugi airfield, he established temporary headquarters some twenty miles away, at the Tokyo Bay city of Yokohama. Arrangements for the formal surrender ceremonies were made there. SCAP headquarters moved to Tokyo on September 8, beginning six years of occupation government from the Japanese capital city.

By August 30 1945, folks were already busy drawing up plans to nuke Soviet targets.

Harry S. Truman
119 - Letter to Byron Price Requesting Him To Study Relations Between U.S. Forces of Occupation and the German People.
August 30, 1945

In accordance with our previous discussions, I am asking you to go to Germany as my personal representative to survey the general subject of relations between the American forces of occupation and the German people. You are hereby authorized to visit any place you deem necessary for this purpose.

I hope you will place yourself at the disposal of General Eisenhower and General Clay for such advice and help as they may want in this field.

At the end of your assignment, the duration of which you yourself will determine, I request you to submit to me your report and recommendations.

[Honorable Byron Price, Washington, D.C. ]

Note: Mr. Price’s report, dated November 9, 1945, was released on November 28. See Item 201. Citation: Harry S. Truman: “Letter to Byron Price Requesting Him To Study Relations Between U.S. Forces of Occupation and the German People.,” August 30, 1945.

Harry S. Truman
117 - Letter to George E. Allen Concerning the Liquidation of War Agencies.
August 30, 1945

As the various war agencies are dissolved from time to time, it will become necessary to liquidate such of their functions as are not transferred to the permanent Departments. This will involve unexpended funds, surplus personnel, and surplus equipment.

Many suggestions have been made as to the most efficient and economical method of carrying on this liquidation.

I have designated you as my Personal Representative to study the whole problem, and to make recommendations to me as to the best means of accomplishing liquidation.

[Mr. George E. Allen, 1522 K Street NW., Washington 5, D.C.]

Citation: Harry S. Truman: “Letter to George E. Allen Concerning the Liquidation of War Agencies.,” August 30, 1945.

Harry S. Truman
Executive Order 9607 - Revoking Executive Order 9301 of February 9, 1943, Establishing a Minimum Wartime Workweek of Forty-Eight Hours

By virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and statues as President of the United States it is ordered that Executive Order 9301 of February 9, 1943, establishing a minimum wartime workweek of forty-eight hours, be, and it is hereby, revoked.

HARRY S. TRUMAN
THE WHITE HOUSE,
August 30, 1945

Citation: Harry S. Truman: “Executive Order 9607 - Revoking Executive Order 9301 of February 9, 1943, Establishing a Minimum Wartime Workweek of Forty-Eight Hours,” August 30, 1945.

Harry S. Truman
118 - The President’s News Conference
August 30, 1945

THE PRESIDENT. [1.] Byron Price has agreed to go to Germany in an advisory capacity on public relations. He is going with the approval of General Eisenhower and General Clay, and I am very happy that he is going, because I think he can be a great deal of help to that situation over there.

[2.] In yesterday’s report which I handed to you I did not know at the time, because I hadn’t had time to read it completely myself, that there had been some aspersions cast on Cordell Hull. I want to agree fully and completely with Secretary Stimson on what he said about Cordell Hull.

[3.] Ambassador Pauley this afternoon will hold a press conference at 3 p.m. on the reparations situation. I think it will be right interesting and instructive to those of you who are interested in reparations.

Now if there are any questions—

[4.] Q. Mr. President, do you plan to confer with General de Gaulle again before he returns to France?

THE PRESIDENT. I don’t know if General de Gaulle returns to Washington I may see him.

[5.] Q. In a magazine article you wrote, or that appeared under your name, when you were a Senator—

THE PRESIDENT. Things come back to haunt you! [Laughter]

Q.—you said Admiral Kimmel and General Short were not on speaking terms. Admiral Kimmel subsequently said that was a false statement.

THE PRESIDENT. Apparently, according to this report, it was not a statement of fact. I was speaking with the best information I had at the time.

Q. Mr. President, was there any reason for putting out the report on the day that we entered Tokyo?

THE PRESIDENT. No, no reason except that there was so much conversation about it there was no ulterior motive to it.

Q. Mr. President, despite what you said yesterday, there are some very strong reports on the Hill and elsewhere that you are going to order the Army and Navy to institute a court-martial proceeding against certain people.

THE PRESIDENT. I am not. The matter has not been brought up to me. I don’t think I have authority to order a court-martial. I think it has to go through a form of procedure set up by Congress.

Q. There is a lot of talk that indicates some of them think the gentlemen, mentioning General Short and Admiral Kimmel, should have a court-martial if for no other reason than to make their side public.

THE PRESIDENT. If they want it, I have no objection to it. I want everybody to be fairly treated.

Q. You would like to see those fellows make their statement ?

THE PRESIDENT. Perfectly satisfactory to me.

Q. Is there any reason why they can’t make it without a court-martial?

THE PRESIDENT. I will not put a muzzle on them.

Q. Representative May represented the reports as a “whitewash.” Do you agree with that?

THE PRESIDENT. I don’t. I don’t think Representative May read the report. [Laughter] If you read them very carefully, they are not a “whitewash.”

Q. In that same article you discussed your feeling for need of unity of command. In the light of these new reports is there anything more you would like to say about that?

THE PRESIDENT. I am still in favor of unity of command, and always have been.

[6.] Q. Mr. President, can you tell us about Mme. Chiang’s visit yesterday?

THE PRESIDENT. She was in to pay her respects before returning to China. We had a very pleasant visit on the situation in the Far East. She was very happy over the Russian-Chinese treaty, just as all of us are.

[7.] Q. Mr. President, did you happen to receive a petition from some people in Indiana, near Indianapolis, about a boy named Colby who has been sentenced to hang in Germany?

THE PRESIDENT. I don’t remember receiving any such petition.

[8.] Q. Mr. President, is there anything you can tell us about the general plans on what we are going to do to feed Europe this winter, now that lend-lease is—

THE PRESIDENT. I can’t give you the details on that. The plans are being studied and worked on. As soon as the British representatives come here from Great Britain I think we will work out a plan that will be satisfactory to all concerned.

Q. You mean there will be an interim period between now and the time when the Bretton Woods monetary agreement begins?

THE PRESIDENT. That’s the present plan.

Q. How much will that involve.

THE PRESIDENT. I can’t tell you, because I haven’t the figures.

[9.] Q. Will Byron Price be your representative or the representative of one of the departments?

THE PRESIDENT. He is my representative.

[10.] Q. Have you any international assignment for Senator Maybank?

THE PRESIDENT. I hope Senator Maybank will stay in the Senate. He is a very excellent Senator.

Q. Did you know he wanted a diplomatic post?

THE PRESIDENT. No, I didn’t. He has never discussed the matter with me.

[11.] Q. Has Justice Roberts changed his mind about that international appointment you wanted to give him?

THE PRESIDENT. He hasn’t made up his mind, and I would rather not discuss it until he does.

[12.] Q. If we may return to the Pearl Harbor report for a moment, it seems to me that anyone who tries to make that clear to himself has a very tough time clarifying such things as why, when Stimson reported that they had told Hull that the Army and Navy wanted 3 months more time, they didn’t know about it, and why, when Hull had broken with these people, that information was not relayed to Hawaii.

THE PRESIDENT. I wasn’t here then.

Q. No, but I wondered if you were clear in your own mind.

THE PRESIDENT. I have read it very carefully, and I came to the conclusion that the whole thing is the result of the policy which the country itself pursued. The country was not ready for preparedness. Every time the President made an effort to get a preparedness program through Congress, it was stifled. Whenever the President made a statement about the necessity of preparedness, he was vilified for doing it. I think the country is as much to blame as any individual in this final situation that developed in Pearl Harbor.

Q. May we have that in quotations, sir, exactly what you said?

[13.] Q. Can you tell us anything more about the nature of Mr. Price’s duties?

THE PRESIDENT. Oh, they just wanted an expert’s advice, and when Price’s job ceased over here, they asked that Price give us the benefit of his experience and advice.

Q. Is that for the benefit of both radio and press?

THE PRESIDENT. Everything that has to do with public relations.

Q. Does that apply to Great Britain?

THE PRESIDENT. And to the United States also.

[14.] Q. Mr. President, there is one thing in the Army and Navy Board reports about Marshall and Stark telling President Roosevelt they were not ready for war in November, and the Army report says that was transmitted November 27.

THE PRESIDENT. I only know what I see in the report.

Q. Mr. President, that’s what made me think a court-martial would help to lay the whole thing out.

THE PRESIDENT. It might—it might. I have no objection to a courtmartial, but I don’t intend to order one.

Q. Any reason now why the whole Roberts committee report1 should not be released?

THE PRESIDENT. Only that there is still some information that should not be divulged that has nothing to do with the Pearl Harbor situation. It is the system by which we get information. We need that source of information now as we needed it then.

1The report “Attack Upon Pearl Harbor by Japanese Armed Forces” of the Commission appointed by President Roosevelt and headed by Associate Justice Owen J. Roberts is printed in Senate Document 159 (77 Gong., 2d sess.).

Q. Mr. President, in all the pages of the volumes there is not a word about the two privates who gave the warning.

THE PRESIDENT. They have been promoted one is a lieutenant and the other a sergeant, I think.

Q. The lieutenant who said “Forget it” is a lieutenant colonel.

THE PRESIDENT. Is he? I didn’t know that.

[15.] Q. Mr. President, do you plan any early recommendation on the St. Lawrence Seaway?

THE PRESIDENT. Yes, I do. I will let you know about it when I get it ready.

[16.] Q. Mr. President, can you tell us further about the interim plan you have in mind between lend-lease and—which departments are working on it?

THE PRESIDENT. State, FEA, and War Department.

[17.] Q. Mr. President, do you have any idea when the 52 pages deleted from the Army report will be made public?2

THE PRESIDENT. I don’t think they ever will be.

2Chapter V of the report of the Army Pearl Harbor Board (released by the President to the press at his news conference of August 29) was omitted in accordance with the Secretary of War’s statement of that date, which the President also released. The missing 52 pages were made public by Secretary of War Patterson on October 5, 1945.

THE PRESIDENT. For the reason I just told you there are sources of information to be protected.

[18.] Q. Did Mme. Chiang talk with you about the relations of China with America and a meeting between you and the Generalissimo?

THE PRESIDENT. The Generalissimo would like very much to see me, and I would like very much to see him, but no definite plans were made for a visit either way.

Reporter: Thank you, Mr. President.

Note: President Truman’s twenty-second news conference was held in his office at the White House at 10 a.m. on Thursday, August 30, 1945. The White House Official Reporter noted that the following special guests attended this conference: Secretary of State James F. Byrnes, Fleet Admiral William D. Leahy, and Mrs. Alfred (Frances) Burns, a reporter on the Boston Globe who was writing a special story on the President.

Citation: Harry S. Truman: “The President’s News Conference,” August 30, 1945.

At 4:59 am we got underway for Tokyo Bay with orders to neutralize Fort #4 and Fort #2, both on islands in Tokyo Bay. As we were entering Tokyo Bay and approaching Fort #4, close to Yokosuka Naval Base, all hands were at general quarters because no one knew how the Japanese were going to react. At 9:34 am two boatloads of British marines were under way for Fort #4. At 9:55 am we proceeded to Fort #2 on an island near the center of the bay. By 10:00 am we had word that Fort #4 was secured. By 10:16 am the other two boats were away with British marines to neutralize Fort #2, and we then anchored off Fort #2. The ship’s camera went in the boats to Fort #2. Hence we have no pictures of Fort #4.

As the boats approached the island fort you could see the white surrender flag flying over it. There is also a small group of soldiers standing near the landing ramp with a surrender flag.

On landing at the boat ramp they found the four-man surrender committee waiting.

The British marines. were apparently a seasoned group of guys who’d been at war for a good six years. In spite of their WW I steel helmets, you had to take them seriously. They really seemed to love the food we had on our ship—which we were not inclined to rate too highly. Actually, I thought it was ok except for the powdered milk and the coffee. They came ashore ready for trouble, but fortunately, there wasn’t any.

In addition to the boat crews, Pavlic’s part of the landing party (right) was a group of volunteers, a mix of various ratings from gunner’s mate to signalman to mailman. When they had asked for volunteers, they got lots of responses, but not from me. With the war over, I thought it would be silly to risk a sniper’s bullet from some dedicated die-hard, unless there was a real need for me to get involved. Not pictured are our fellows in the boat crews, which also went ashore.

Pictured. is the formal surrender ceremony in which the big surrender flag is being lowered. This was supposed to be a surrender to the British landing party. However, the Japanese were willing to surrender to the Americans, not to the British. Consequently there was a hurried boat trip back to the ship to get an American flag. Everything then went smoothly and US colors were raised over Fort #2 shortly thereafter.

It wasn’t as dramatic as the raising of the flag over Iwo Jima, but it was probably one of the first formal surrender ceremonies in the Tokyo area. .

Some interesting background on the contacts that led to cooperation between MacArthur and Hirohito.


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USS LST-462 was a United States Navy LST-1-class tank landing ship used in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater during World War II. As with many of her class, the ship was never named. Instead, she was referred to by her hull designation.


Pavlik Morozov

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Pavlik Morozov, byname of Pavel Trofimovich Morozov, (born Nov. 14, 1918, Gerasimovka, Russia—died Sept. 3, 1932, Gerasimovka), Russian communist youth who was glorified as a martyr by the Soviet regime.

The son of poor peasants, Morozov was the leader of the Young Pioneers’ group at his village school and was a fanatical supporter of the Soviet government’s collectivization drive in the countryside. In 1930, at age 12, he gained notoriety for denouncing his father, the head of the local soviet, to the Soviet authorities. In court Morozov charged that his father had forged documents and sold favours to kulaks (i.e., rich peasants who were resisting the collectivization drive). Morozov also accused other peasants of hoarding their grain and withholding it from the authorities. As a consequence of his denunciations, Morozov was brutally murdered by several local kulaks.

Morozov was subsequently glorified as a martyr by the Soviet regime. Monuments to him were erected in several Soviet cities, and his example as a model communist was taught to several generations of Soviet schoolchildren. By the late 20th century, however, his legend had dropped into disfavour with the liberalizing Soviet regime, which viewed him as a tragic symbol of the pressures that Stalinism could exert upon the family.


Pavlic APD-70 - History

USS LSM(R)-196 crew members Joe Clapaftisi S1/c, at left, (note the "regulation" shoes) and Patrick Curtain RM3/c at right, loading rockets at Aka Shima, Ryukyu Islands, 31 March 1945.US Navy photo # 313661 from the collections of the US Naval Historical Center.

This site is dedicated to those who served on 12 unique US Navy ships during World War II that were designed specifically for the invasion of the Japanese home islands. Each of these ships performed separately and in combined actions with other ships in the battle of Okinawa. The 12 LSM(R)'s, Landing Ship Medium (Rockets) have a common legacy as an interim class to provide near shore ground support fire prior to the invasion of the beaches of Okinawa during March through May 1945.

The site is maintained by World War II LSM(R) shipmates and their families. Click on Underlined addresses for links to other sites.

Service History

Flagships and dates for LSM Flotilla Nine and LSM(R) Group 27: Compiled by Ron MacKay, Jr.

LSM Flotilla Nine Flagships: Commander Dennis L. Francis, USN

1 December 1944 at 1400 hoisted LSM Flotilla Nine/LSM(R) Group 27 flag on temporary flagship USS LSM(R) 193 in Charleston , SC

30 January 1945 at 1800 hoisted LSM Flotilla Nine flag on temporary flagship USS LSM(R) 196 in Pearl Harbor , HI

12 March 1945 hoisted LSM Flotilla Nine flag on USS LC(FF) 535 in Kossol Roads, Palau .

LSM(R) Group 27 Flagships: Lt. Commander John H. Fulweiler, USNR

29 November 1944 assumed command of LSM(R) Group 27 and flag hoisted on temporary flagship USS LSM(R) 188 in Charleston , SC

1 February 1945 hoisted flag on flagship USS LSM(R) 193 in Pearl Harbor , HI .

[NB: While LSM(R) 193 served on radar picket duty at Okinawa , LCDR Fulweiler and staff were frequently transferred among other LSM(R)s at Hagushi Anchorage].

The 1944 - 45 service history of each of the 12 interim LSM(R)'s can be accessed at the following Wikipedia sites.

Crewmen who were killed on the USS LSM(R)-188 on March 29, 1945 include: George E. Brooks S1/c, William P. Mader S1/c, Joseph P. Olewnik Cox, Edwin M. Prada S1/c, Jack H. Slease S1/c, William D. Wright S1/c, Carroll B. Ligon FC3/c, William A. Cooper S1/c, Harold C. Zahn PhM1/c, Albert F. Miller GM1/c, Carl T. Loos GM2/c, Robert A. McPheron S1/c, Weldon Lemon StM1/c, James R. Flasher RM3/c, Gilmer E. Adams S2/c, Alvin M. Anderson S2/c and A.J. Smith S2/c.

The following crewmembers of the LSM(R)-190 were killed on May 4, 1945.S1c William R. Toy, Ensign Stuart C. Borklund, S1c Henry H. Carpenter, S2c Henry A. Cherney, FC3c CecilC. Cox Jr., GM1c John D. Hasbrouck, S2c Ralph Scheneman Jr., S1c Ivan Sturgeon, GM2c Francis Whaley, S1c James A. Massi, F1c Herbert L. Colclough, GM1c Thomas J. Dutton Jr., EM2c Arthur Armstrong

The following LSM(R)194 crewmembers were killed on May 4, 1945, S1c Albert J. Arnhold, S1c Edward T Bleakley, S1c Joseph T. Callen, S2c Boyd L. Carr, S2c Leonard P. Collins, MoMM2c John R. Despard, S1c Clarence L. Ellis, MoMM3c Asa E. Fitts, F1c Edward J. Kuligowski, F1c Herbert Myerowitz, F1/c Keith A. Place, Cox John W. Smith, S3c Hayden Edwards Thomas

The following LSM(R) 195 crew were killed in action on May 3, 1945 Ensign Thomas H. Milliken, S2c William J. Burke, EM3/c Hyman Kernes, PhM2c Daniel W. Styles seen by several men in the water trying to help wounded men, F1c George Ruhlman USS Pavlic (APD-70), GM1/c Joseph A. Hale, S2c Karl L. Dickens and Ensign James Ruemmelli McKelvey who was blown into the water from the area of the Forward Repair party and sustained severe burns together with a head injury. He was transferred to Base Hospital #18 where he died on 25 May 1945. F1c James Tallary, Jr. was stationed as a 20 MM gunner on the port side of the ship. As the suicide run started in his sector, he stayed at his gun firing at the plane until it actually crashed within 15 feet of him. He was a great inspiration to his gun crew and shipmates by his example. He remained at his gun until he was blown from the ship by the violent initial explosion. F1c Tallary was found in the water, critically burned, and dragged to a life raft where first aid was administered. His wounds were too severe and he died aboard the USS Crescent City (APA-21) on May 4, 1945.

USS LSM(R)-196 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_LSM(R)-196 GM1/c Joseph Straum KIA when hit by mortar shell while patrolling off the coast of Okinawa

The LSM(R) 188-199 were created by converting Landing Ship Medium (LSM's) shortly after they were launched in late 1944 at East Coast shipyards. Although several hundred LSM's were added to the fleet during 1944 battle experience identified new weapon requirements for the invasion of the Japanese home islands. Only 12 were converted to LSM(R)'s for the Battle of Okinawa in 1945. Several other LSM(R)'s were updated and constructed later. However the dropping of A-bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki led to the unconditional surrender of Japan and the planned invasion of the Japan home islands was precluded.

The origins of the LSM(R) can be traced to a British Admiralty lend lease request for special amphibious transports to land tanks for the invasion of France.

This presented two design problems. It required the design of ocean going ships that could safely and efficiently travel from the US to England and second include shallow drafts and flat bottoms for beach landings.

During October 1941 Major R. E. Holloway, Royal Engineers, brought to the attention of the US Navy an idea patented by Otto Popper of Bratislava, Czechoslovakia in 1924 of a barge transporter for use on the Danube River that flooded down to allow barges aboard, then pumped out it tanks to lift them out of the water. Norman Freidman reports that on November 4, 1941 this concept lead to the breakthrough design by John C. Niedermair, civilian technical director, BuShips preliminary design section, based on ballasting techniques used on submarines that solved both design problems. This led to the construction of thousands of flat bottom US Navy landing ships including the original LST's and with hundreds of incremental improvements modifications and conversions of LTC's, LCI's, LCM's, LSM's, LCS's, LCP's, LCV's, LCVP's, LSD's (floating drydock), track amphibious LVT's and the amphibious DUKW's (Ducks).

British and US visionaries instrumental in supporting the concept include Captain Thomas A Hussey, COHO, and Sir Henry C. B. Weymss of the British mission to the US, Captain Edward Cochrane BuShips, the Army's Chief of Staff General George C. Marshall and Winston Churchill when he personally pushed the project for special landing ships and won President Roosevelt's reluctant approval.

This decision proved providential a short time later with the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The design criteria for the US Navy landing ships for the invasion of Japan was already underway.

In 1944 with the US Navy BuOrd's mounting of a 5-inch/38 gun and state of the art rocket launchers on the LSM its mission changed and the LSM(R) became the "ultimate" near shore landing troop fire support out to 4,000 yards beyond the beach, designed for interdiction, harassment, destruction, illumination and high trajectory fire to destroy reverse slope targets for the invasion of Japan.

The American plan for defense against the kamikazes was to have fighters intercept the Japanese as early as possible. Sixteen radar picket stations were established around the island, in some cases almost 100 miles out, to give early warning of the Japanese planes which might be coming from any direction. Each station was manned around the clock by a handful of ships ranging from destroyers down to minesweepers. Their job was to sound the alarm and vector fighters to intercept before the Japanese could attack the fleet anchored off Okinawa and the Allied forces and supply dumps ashore. Unfortunately, some of the eager-to-die Japanese wanted to attack the first American ships they saw: the pickets. Dennis L. Francis LSM Commander, Flotilla Nine for the period April 2 - April 20, Action Report (See Attached C.T.G. 52.21) indicated that . . ."these ships are not particularly suited for picket duty. Since their primary function is to deliver rockets during invasion operations, it seems feasible that subjecting them to continual enemy air attack will allow this secondary duty to seriously affect their ability to perform their primary function due to damage. They have no great value in combating enemy air craft due to the absence of air search radar, adequate director control for the 5"/38 main battery, and director control for the 40mm single guns. The fact that they carry a considerable quantity of explosive rockets in their magazines presents another hazard. In general, it is believed that assigning them to picket duty should be avoided since it means risking the operation of a limited number of specialized ships which could be performed by any number of other landing craft whose primary function is more closely coincident with screening operations." Before these recommendations were implemented the USS LSMR-195 was sunk on May 3, 1945 with 9 killed and 16 wounded, the USS LSMR-190 was sunk on 4 May 1945 with 13 killed and 18 wounded, the USS LSMR-194 was sunk on May 4, 1945 with 13 killed and 23 wounded.

If you are able, save a place for them inside you, and save one backward glance when leaving for places they can not go, be not ashamed to say you loved them. Take what they have left and what they have taught you with their dying and keep it with your own, and in that time when men decide and feel safe to call war insane, take one moment to embrace those gentle heroes you left behind.