History Podcasts

Smith II DD-378 - History

Smith II DD-378 - History


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Smith II DD-378

Smith II(DD-378: dp. 1,480,1. 341'4", b. 34'8", dr. 9'9"; s. 35 k.; cpl. 235; a. 4 5", 12 21" tt.; cl. Mahan)The second 9mith (DD-378) was laid down on 27 October 1934 by Mare Island Navy Yard, Mare Island Calif.; launched on 20 February 1936; sponsored by Mrs. Yancey S. Williams; and commissioned on 19 September 1936, Comdr. H. L. Grosskopf in command.At the outbreak of the war, Smith was in San Francisco attached to Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 5 and from then until April 1942, she performed escort duty from the west coast to Pearl Harbor. On 7 April, Smith was assigned to Task Force (TF) 1, composed of Battleship Division 3, which held extensive training exercises along the west coast until it departed for Pearl Harbor on 1 June. Upon her arrival, Smith was assigned to TF 17 commanded by Vice Admiral MarcMitscher. She engaged in war patrols and training exercises for a month and then escorted a convoy back to San Franciseo. After overhaul and subsequent sea trials in the Bay Arra, she returned to Pearl Harbor in mid-August and began a period of training and upkeep. On 15 October, she was assigned to TF 16 composed of Enterprise (CV-6) and South Dakota (BB-57). TF 16 departed Pearl Harbor on war patrol, on 16 October, and was joined the following week by Portland (CA-33) and San Juan (CL-54) with their destroyer screen.The task force was operating northwest of the New Hebrides Islands when, on 24 October, it was notified that a Japanese carrier force was converging on Guadalcanal. TF 17 Hornet (CV-8) and its cruiser-destroyer screen, joined TF 16 and the merged force was designated TF 61.On 26 October, scout planes from Enterprise located the Japanese force and they also found ours. At 0944, the first enemy planes were sighted and Hornet was hit by bombs 30 minutes later. At 1125, Smith was attacked by a formation of 20 torpedo planes. Twenty minutes later, a Japanese torpedo plane crashed into her forecastle, causing a heavy explosion. The forward part of the ship was enveloped in a sheet of smoke and flame from bursting gasoline tanks and the bridge had to be abandoned. The entire forward deck house was aflame, making topside forward of number one stack untenable. Smith's gunners splashed six of the planes. By early afternoon, the crew had extinguished all of the fires forward. With 57 killed or missing, 12 wounded, her magazines flooded, and temporary loss of steering control from the pilot house, Smith retained her position in the screen with all serviceable guns firing. Action was broken off in the evening, and Smith headed to Noumea for temporary repairs. She was patched up and underway for Pearl Harbor on 5 November. At Pearl Harbor, she underwent a yard overhaul and sea trials that lasted into February 1943 .Smith departed on 12 February for Espiritu Santo as screen for Wright (CVL-49). Gridley (DD-380) joined the screen there, and the ships proceeded to Guadalcanal where Smith performed antisubmarine patrols until 12 March. She then returned to Espiritu Santo and participated in various patrols and tactical and logistical exercises with TF 10 in the New Caledonia-Coral Sea area until 28 April. Smith returned to Pearl Harbor the following month for logistics and then sailed for Australia.Smith was attached to DesRon 5 which conducted exercises in the Townsville~Cape Moreton area to June 10th, and then escorted merchant shipping and landing craft to Milne Bay, remaining there the remainder of July. Smith departed for McKay, Australia, and yard availability on 1 August. When this was completed, she returned to Milne Bay for further exercises and preparations for impending operations with the Seventh Fleet.Smith, with destroyers Perkins (DD-377), Conyngham (DD-371), and Mahan (DD-364), bombarded Finschhafen, New Guinea, on 23 August without opposition. The squadron returned to Milne Bay and participated in exercises until 2 September when it sailed with TF 76 for the Huon Gulf area of New Guinea. Smith bombarded targets in her assigned area of "Red Beach" prior to landings by the 9th Australian Infantry Division on 4 September. She remained in the area on offensive sweeps antisubmarine patrols, and as antiaircraft defense until 18 September. On the night of 7-8 September, the squadron shelled Lae.During the period 20 to 23 September, Smith participated in the bombardment and landings at Finschhafen as a unit o£ TF 76. Enemy air attacks were carried out against the task force with no damage to it, but they lost 16 planes to fighter cover or naval gunfire. Smith then returned to Holuicote Bay for resupply operations to Lae and Finschbafen.On 3 October, Smith, Nenley (DD-391), and Reid (DD-369) were assigned to make an antisubmarinesweep of Huon Gulf. At 1821, three torpedo wakes were sighted abaft Smith's port beam. She made a right full rudder and slipped between two of the torpedos-one passing 500 yards to port, the other 200 yards to starboard. Henley took a torpedo on the port side and, six minutes later, broke in half, disappearing from sight at 1832. Smith made a depth charge attack that proved futile. The squadron spent the remainder of the month in resupply operations to forward areas. Smith had a short availability period in Milne Bay the first of November and then returned to the Lae Finschhafen area.On 14 December, Smith was attached to the Arawe Attack Force forming at Holnicote Bay and departed for that operation. The next morning, she shelled "Orange Beach," Cape Merkus, and covered the operation with other units of DesRon 5. The squadron then returned to Milne Bay to prepare for the invasion of Cape Gloucester, New Britain.Smith stood out from Buna on Christmas Day as escort for the Cape Gloucester Attack Force (TF 76) and as a unit of the bombardment group. The next morning, she shelled "Green Beach," Cape Gloucester in preparation for the assault by marines of the First Marine Division. She escorted resupply ships to the landing area the following week.Smith was a unit of the Saidor Attack Force when, on 1 January 1944, she was rammed astern by Hutchins (DD-476) and forced to return to Milne Bay for repairs. She soon rejoined the squadron in resupply operations to Cape Gloucester and the Lae area. Smith shelled enemy gun emplacements in the vicinity of Herwath Point and Singor, on 13 February, in preparation for the landings there.On the 28th, Smith departed Cape Sudest, as a unit of the Admiralty Islands Attack Group, with 71 officers and men of the First Cavalry Division aboard to be landed on Los Negros Island. The next morning, she began bombardment of designated targets along the northern shore of Hyane Harbor. The troops were landed and Smith provided call fire until that evening when she shuttled more troops to the landing area.On 17 March, Smith, with DesRon 5, departed the South Pacific en route to San Francisco via Pearl Harbor. The overhaul period there was completed by 21 June, and the squadron sailed for Pearl Harbor, spending the next five weeks in training exercises and gunnery practice. On 1 August, Smith was ordered to Eniwetok and patrolled the enemy-occupied Marshalls until 24 September when she joined TG 57.9, composed of Cruiser Division 6, and departed for Saipan. The task group began offensive patrols of the Northern Marianas to protect that Central Pacific outpost from enemy attack. Smith returned to En,iwetok in early October, made an escort trip to Ulithi, and then sailed to Hollandia.Smith was attached to the 7th Fleet on 26 October and the next day set course for Leyte Gulf, P.I., arriving at San Pedro three days later. She patrolled Leyte Gulf as a unit of TG 77.1 from 1 to 16 November and then escorted a convoy to New Georgia and back. She was ordered to rendezvous on 6 December with the Ormac Attack Group to bombard enemy positions ashore and then to land the 77th Army Division there. The group arrived in the Ormac Bay area the next morning, and Smith was stationed northeast of Ponson Island as fighter director ship. At 0945, enemy aircraft attacked the fleet. At least three suicide planes dived on Mahan and three on Ward (DD-483). Both were badly damaged and later sunk by friendly gunfire when it was ascertained the fires could not be brought under control or the ships salvaged. Air attacks continued throughout the morning and when the landing force was disembarked the attack group retired to Leyte.Smith and DesRon 5, departing San Pedro with a resupply echelon for Ormac Bay on 11 December, were attacked that evening in Leyte Gulf by a force of enemy planes. At 1704, Reid was hit by a bomb and a suicide plane. There was a violent explosion, and she heeled over and sank at 1706. Smith splashed four of the enemyplanes. The next morning, the formation was again attacked by Japanese planes, and Caldwell (DD-605) was hit by a kamikaze which set her afire. No other hits were sustained by the destroyers, and Smith continued resupply operations until the 17th when she sailed to Manus for logistics and maintenance.Smith was back in Leyte Gulf on 6 January 1945 as a unit in the screen of TG 79.2 proceeding to support amphibious landings in Lingayen Gulf, Luzon. There was a heavy air attack two days later in which Kilkun Bay (CVE-71) was seriously damaged by a kamikaze. Smith, 3,000 yards away, stood by to rescue survivors. She took on board over 200 sailors. On 9 January, she was able to transfer these men back to Kitkun Bay which was now proceeding under her own steam. Smith was then assigned to patrol the northern Lingayen Gulf. From 28 January to 20 February, she screened convoys to Hollandia, Sansapor, and Leyte. In Leyte on the 20th, she was assigned to screen a convoy to Mangarin Bay, Mindoro. While passing through the Mindanao Sea the next morning, Rershaw (DD-499) was hit by a torpedo and seriously damaged. Smith went alongside to transfer wounded, furnish electricity, and begin pumping out the after engine room with fire and bilge pumps. She towed Renshaw for six hours until she was relieved, to proceed independently to San Pedro and transfer the wounded who had been taken on board.En route to Mindoro on the 24th, Smith picked up a radar contact that failed to respond to her blinker requesting identification. When the contact was illuminated, it proved to be a Japanese steam lugger of 200 tons. The target was taken under fire at 2147 and destroyed by 2158. Smith departed Mindoro on 26 February as a unit of the Puerta Princesa, Palawan Attack Group (TG 78.2). She was on station two days later and at 0818 began firing preliminary shore bombardment on "White Beach." She then patrolled the entrance of Palawan Harbor until 4 March. Smith was relieved from patrol and made two runs to Palawan as escort for supply ships.On 24 March, Smith again sailed with TG 78.2. This time the objective was to transport and land the American Infantry Division at Cebu City, Cebu Island. Smith bombarded the landing beaches the morning of the assault, 28 March, and after the forces landed, provided them with call fire. Over one eight-day period, she expended 1,200 rounds of 5-inch ammunition. On 23 April, she departed the Philippines with orders to join TG 78.1 at Morotai.The group sortied from Morota; on 27 April 1945 transporting the 26th Australian Infantry Brigade to Tarakan Island, Borneo, for an amphibious landing. Smith began preliminary bombardment of the landing beaches at 0700, 1 May, and remained on station until the 19th as call fire support ship, screening picket, and harbor entrance patrol. Smith retired to Morotai, sailed to Zamboanga, rendezvoused with Mettawee (AOG-17) and escorted her back to Tarakan. She then provided night gunfire support for the Australians until ordered back to Morotai.There, she was attached to Rear Admiral Noble's T(r 78.2 on 26 June and again sailed for Borneo. This time the objective was Balikpapan, Borneo, where the First Australian Corps was to be landed. Smith began shore bombardment at 0700, 1 July, and received return fire from enemy guns ashore that splashed close aboard. The Japanese gunners finally got her range and sent three shells through her number one stack. The shells failed to explode, and only superficial damage was done. One visible gun emplacement was taken under counterbattery fire and silenced. Smith left the next day for Morotai, picked up a resupply convoy, and was back in Balikpapan on 16 July. She departed on the 24th for San Pedro and tender availability.Smith departed the Philippines on 15 August for Buckner Bay; remained there for two weeks and sailed for Nagasaki Harbor, Kyushu. On 15 September, 90 exprisoners of war boarded; and, the next morning, Smith steamed for Okinawa to transfer them to the United States. She picked up 90 more Allied military personnel at Nagasaki on 21 September and transported them back to Rerville (APA-227) in Buckner Bay.Smith arrived in Sasebo on 28 September and departed two days later for San Diego, via Pearl Harbor. She docked in San Diego on 19 November and remained there until ordered to Pearl Harbor on 28 December for disposal or inactivation. She arrived in Pearl Harbor on 3 January 1946 and assumed an inactive status. Smith was decommissioned on 28 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 25 February 1947.Smith received six battle stars for World War II service.


1941-42 [ edit | edit source ]

At the outbreak of the war, Smith was in San Francisco, California attached to Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 5 and from then until April 1942, she performed escort duty from the west coast to Pearl Harbor. On 7 April, Smith was assigned to Task Force (TF) 1, composed of Battleship Division 3, which held extensive training exercises along the West Coast until it departed for Pearl Harbor on 1 June. Upon her arrival, Smith was assigned to TF㺑 commanded by Vice Admiral Marc Mitscher. She engaged in war patrols and training exercises for a month and then escorted a convoy back to San Francisco. After overhaul and subsequent sea trials in the Bay Area, she returned to Pearl Harbor in mid-August and began a period of training and upkeep. On 15 October, she was assigned to TF 16 composed of Enterprise (CV-6) and South Dakota (BB-57). TF㺐 departed Pearl Harbor on war patrol, on 16 October, and was joined the following week by Portland (CA-33) and San Juan (CL-54) with their destroyer screen.

The task force was operating northwest of the New Hebrides Islands when, on 24 October, it was notified that a Japanese carrier force was converging on Guadalcanal. Task Force 17 (TF17), Hornet (CV-8) and its cruiser-destroyer screen, joined TF㺐 and the merged force was designated TF 61.

On 26 October, scout planes from Enterprise located the Japanese force. At 0944, the first Japanese planes were sighted and Hornet was hit by bombs 30 minutes later. At 1125, Smith was attacked by a formation of 20 torpedo planes. Twenty minutes later, a Japanese torpedo plane crashed into her forecastle, causing a heavy explosion.

According to one version, the torpedo carried by the plane had not exploded on impact, but did so some time later. This caused even more damage and casualties. ΐ] The forward part of the ship was enveloped in a sheet of smoke and flame from bursting gasoline tanks and the bridge had to be abandoned. The entire forward deckhouse was aflame, making topside forward of number one stack untenable. Smith's gunners downed six of the planes. By early afternoon, the crew had extinguished all of the fires forward—largely assisted by her Commanding Officer's decision to steer the burning ship into the wake of USS South Dakota. Ώ] With 57 killed or missing, 12 wounded, her magazines flooded, and temporary loss of steering control from the pilothouse, Smith retained her position in the screen with all serviceable guns firing. Action was broken off in the evening, and Smith headed to Noumea for temporary repairs. She was patched up and underway for Pearl Harbor on 5 November. At Pearl Harbor, she underwent a yard overhaul and sea trials that lasted into February 1943.

The USS Smith was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation for continuing to fight despite crippling damage to the ship.

1943 [ edit | edit source ]

Smith departed on 12 February for Espiritu Santo as screen for Wright (CVL-49). Gridley (DD-380) joined the screen there, and the ships proceeded to Guadalcanal where Smith performed antisubmarine patrols until 12 March. She then returned to Espiritu Santo and participated in various patrols and tactical and logistical exercises with TF㺊 in the New Caledonia-Coral Sea area until 28 April. Smith returned to Pearl Harbor the following month for logistics and then sailed for Australia.

Smith was attached to DesRon 5 which conducted exercises in the Townsville-Cape Moreton area to 10 June, and then escorted merchant shipping and landing craft to Milne Bay, remaining there the remainder of July. Smith departed for Mackay, Australia, and yard availability on 1 August. When this was completed, she returned to Milne Bay for further exercises and preparations for impending operations with the Seventh Fleet.

Smith, with destroyers Perkins (DD-377), Conyngham (DD-371), and Mahan (DD-364), bombarded Finschhafen, New Guinea, on 23 August without opposition. The squadron returned to Milne Bay and participated in exercises until 2 September when it sailed with TF㻌 for the Huon Gulf area of New Guinea. Smith bombarded targets in her assigned area of "Red Beach" prior to landings by the 9th Australian Infantry Division on 4 September. She remained in the area on offensive sweeps, antisubmarine patrols, and as antiaircraft defense until 18 September. On the night of 7/8 September, the squadron shelled Lae.

During the period 20 to 23 September, Smith participated in the bombardment and landings at Finschhafen as a unit of TF㻌. Enemy air attacks were carried out against the task force with no damage to it, but they lost 16 planes to fighter cover or naval gunfire. Smith then returned to Holnicote Bay for resupply operations to Lae and Finschhafen.

On 3 October, Smith, Henley (DD-391), and Reid (DD-369) were assigned to make an antisubmarinesweep of Huon Gulf. At 1821, three torpedo wakes were sighted abaft Smith's port beam. She made a right full rudder and slipped between two of the torpedoes—one passing 500 yards (460 m) to port, the other 200 yards (180 m) to starboard. Henley took a torpedo on the port side and, six minutes later, broke in half, disappearing from sight at 1832. Smith made a depth charge attack that proved futile. The squadron spent the remainder of the month in resupply operations to forward areas. Smith had a short availability period in Milne Bay the first of November and then returned to the Lae-Finschhafen area.

On 14 December, Smith was attached to the Arawe Attack Force forming at Holnicote Bay and departed for that operation. The next morning, she shelled "Orange Beach," Cape Merkus, and covered the operation with other units of DesRon 5. The squadron then returned to Milne Bay to prepare for the invasion of Cape Gloucester, New Britain.

Smith stood out from Buna on Christmas Day as escort for the Cape Gloucester Attack Force (TF㻌) and as a unit of the bombardment group. The next morning, she shelled "Green Beach," Cape Gloucester, in preparation for the assault by Marines of the First Marine Division. She escorted resupply ships to the landing area the following week.

1944 [ edit | edit source ]

Smith was a unit of the Saidor Attack Force when, on 1 January 1944, she was rammed astern by Hutchins (DD-476) and forced to return to Milne Bay for repairs. She soon rejoined the squadron in resupply operations to Cape Gloucester and the Lae area. Smith shelled gun emplacements in the vicinity of Herwath Point and Singor, on 13 February, in preparation for the landings there.

On the 28th, Smith departed Cape Sudest, as a unit of the Admiralty Islands Attack Group, with 71 officers and men of the First Cavalry Division aboard to be landed on Los Negros Island. On 29 February, she began bombardment of designated targets along the northern shore of Hyane Harbor. The troops were landed and Smith provided call fire until that evening when she shuttled more troops to the landing area.

On 17 March, Smith, with DesRon 5, departed the South Pacific en route to San Francisco via Pearl Harbor. The overhaul period there was completed by 21 June and the squadron sailed for Pearl Harbor, spending the next five weeks in training exercises and gunnery practice. On 1 August, Smith was ordered to Eniwetok and patrolled the enemy-occupied Marshall Islands until 24 September when she joined TG㺹.9, composed of Cruiser Division 5, and departed for Saipan. The task group began offensive patrols of the Northern Marianas to protect that Central Pacific outpost from enemy attack. Smith returned to Eniwetok in early October, made an escort trip to Ulithi, and then sailed to Hollandia.

Smith was attached to the 7th Fleet on 26 October and the next day set course for Leyte Gulf, P.I., arriving at San Pedro three days later. She patrolled Leyte Gulf as a unit of TG㻍.1 from 1 to 16 November and then escorted a convoy to New Georgia and back. She was ordered to rendezvous on 6 December with the Ormac Attack Group to bombard enemy positions ashore and then to land the 77th Army Division there. The group arrived in the Ormac Bay area the next morning, and Smith was stationed northeast of Ponson Island as fighter director ship. At 0945, enemy aircraft attacked the fleet. At least three suicide planes dived on Mahan (DD-364) and three on Aaron Ward (DD-483). Both were badly damaged and later sunk by friendly gunfire when it was ascertained the fires could not be brought under control or the ships salvaged. Air attacks continued throughout the morning and when the landing force was disembarked, the attack group retired to Leyte.

Smith and DesRon 5, departing San Pedro with a resupply echelon for Ormac Bay on 11 December, were attacked that evening in Leyte Gulf by a force of enemy planes. At 1704, Reid was hit by a bomb and a suicide plane. There was a violent explosion, and she heeled over and sank at 1706. Smith downed four of the enemy planes. The next morning, the formation was again attacked by Japanese planes, and Caldwell (DD-605) was hit by a kamikaze which set her afire. No other hits were sustained by the destroyers, and Smith continued resupply operations until the 17th when she sailed to Manus for logistics and maintenance.

1945 [ edit | edit source ]

Smith was back in Leyte Gulf on 6 January 1945 as a unit in the screen of TG㻏.2 proceeding to support amphibious landings in Lingayen Gulf, Luzon. There was a heavy air attack two days later in which Kitkun Bay (CVE-71) was seriously damaged by a kamikaze. Smith, 3,000 yards (2,700 m) away, stood by to rescue survivors. She took on board over 200 sailors. On 9 January, she was able to transfer these men back to Kitkun Bay which was now proceeding under her own steam. Smith was then assigned to patrol the northern Lingayen Gulf. From 28 January to 20 February, she screened convoys to Hollandia, Sansapor, and Leyte. In Leyte on the 20th, she was assigned to screen a convoy to Mangarin Bay, Mindoro. While passing through the Mindanao Sea the next morning, Renshaw (DD-499) was hit by a torpedo and seriously damaged. Smith went alongside to transfer wounded, furnish electricity, and begin pumping out the after engine room with fire and bilge pumps. She towed Renshaw for six hours until she was relieved, to proceed independently to San Pedro and transfer the wounded who had been taken on board.

En route to Mindoro on the 24th, Smith picked up a radar contact that failed to respond to her blinker requesting identification. When the contact was illuminated, it proved to be a Japanese steam lugger of 200 tons. The target was taken under fire at 2147 and destroyed by 2158. Smith departed Mindoro on 26 February as a unit of the Puerta Princesa, Palawan Attack Group (TG㻎.2). She was on station two days later and at 0818 began firing preliminary shore bombardment on "White Beach." She then patrolled the entrance of Palawan Harbor until 4 March. Smith was relieved from patrol and made two runs to Palawan as escort for supply ships.

On 24 March, Smith again sailed with TG㻎.2. This time the objective was to transport and land the American 1st Infantry Division at Cebu City, Cebu Island. Smith bombarded the landing beaches the morning of the assault, 28 March, and after the forces landed, provided them with call fire. Over one eight-day period, she expended 1,200 rounds of 5-inch (130 mm) ammunition. On 23 April, she departed the Philippines with orders to join TG㻎.1 at Morotai.

The group sortied from Morotai on 27 April 1945, transporting the 26th Australian Infantry Brigade to Tarakan Island, Borneo, for an amphibious landing. Smith began preliminary bombardment of the landing beaches at 0700, 1 May, and remained on station until the 19th as call fire support ship, screening picket, and harbor entrance patrol. Smith retired to Morotai, sailed to Zamboanga, rendezvoused with Mettawee (AOG-17) and escorted her back to Tarakan. She then provided night gunfire support for the Australians until ordered back to Morotai.

There, she was attached to Rear Admiral Noble's TG㻎.2 on 26 June and again sailed for Borneo. This time the objective was Balikpapan, Borneo, where the First Australian Corps was to be landed. Smith began shore bombardment at 0700, 1 July, and received return fire from enemy guns ashore that splashed close aboard. The Japanese gunners finally got her range and sent three shells through her number one stack. The shells failed to explode, and only superficial damage was done. One visible gun emplacement was taken under counterbattery fire and silenced. Smith left the next day for Morotai, picked up a resupply convoy, and was back in Balikpapan on 16 July. She departed on the 24th for San Pedro and tender availability.


Smith II DD-378 - History

A Tin Can Sailors
Destroyer History

The new destroyer was laid down on October 27, 1934 and launched sixteen months later. She would be commissioned on September 19, 1936.

Like her sisters, USS SMITH was initially assigned to the American fleet in the Pacific. Following the usual round of cruises, training exercises, and fleet problems, SMITH settled into the increasingly hectic pace of a navy preparing for war. December 7, 1941 found the destroyer serving with DESRON 5, convoying supplies from the West Coast to the Hawaiian Islands. Her training would stand her in good stead, however. By the fall of 1942, after extensive training operations with TASK FORCE 17, she was ready to sail directly into the maelstrom in the South Pacific.

In October, SMITH was detailed to serve with TASK FORCE 16, whose principal elements included the big carrier USS ENTERPRISE (CV-6) and the new battleship, USS SOUTH DAKOTA (BB-57). The force would be reinforced on its voyage south the cruisers USS PORTLAND (CA-33) and USS SAN JUAN (CL-54) and their screen joined within a week as the task force entered waters northwest of Guadalcanal. Ultimately, SMITH's force would rendezvous with TASK FORCE 17, including USS HORNET (CV-8) and her powerful cruiser-destroyer screen. The new unit, TASK FORCE 61, was now ready for a scrap.

In the subsequent Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, opposing carrier forces launched deadly attacks. SMITH was attacked by twenty Nakajima B5N2 "Kate" naval torpedo bombers and the valiant destroyer succeeded in fighting them off. Less than an hour later, another torpedo bomber, this one already damaged by the heavy anti-aircraft barrage put up by SMITH and the others of her screen, crashed into the destroyer's forecastle. Even with her forward deckhouse aflame past her bridge, SMITH continued to put up an effective fusillade six aircraft were credited to DD-378's sharp-eyed gunners. By afternoon her fires were out, but she had sixty-nine casualties, her magazines were flooded, and control had been shifted aft. Still, she held her position in the carrier screen, firing all guns that would bear against repeated attacks, until the battle finally ended that evening. Her wounds would require a four-month visit to the repair facilities at Pearl Harbor.

USS SMITH would be attached to the Seventh Amphibious Force, supporting GEN Douglas MacArthur's attacks through the southwest Pacific. The next several months were marked by endless hours of convoy duty, anti-submarine patrols, shore bombardment, and anti-air defense. On October 3, 1943, SMITH, USS REID (DD-369) and USS HENLEY (DD- 391) were sweeping the waters of Huon Gulf on the eastern end of New Guinea. In the depths, the Japanese submarine RO-108 waited for her opportunity. SMITH sighted the torpedo wakes first and radioed a warning as she twisted to evade the menace. Torpedoes passed down either beam of the destroyer, but HENLEY was not as lucky. DD- 391 was hit by a torpedo and broke in half six minutes later. SMITH depth-charged the submarine fruitlessly.

DD-378 would fight her way through the South Pacific for the remainder of 1943, from beachhead to beachhead, providing supporting fire and escorting convoys.

By the fall of 1944, American forces were moving toward the Philippines and USS SMITH was transferred to the massive Seventh Fleet for the largest invasion fleet yet to set sail in the Pacific. The veteran destroyer would serve in the classic battles around Ormoc Bay, fighting off some of the first kamikaze attacks in the Pacific campaign. In the group assigned to screen convoys reinforcing the beachhead at Ormoc Bay, one destroyer was sunk and one badly damaged by the Japanese suiciders, but SMITH accounted for four of the attackers and came out of the operation unhurt. The new year opened with more kamikaze activity, this time SMITH was called upon to rescue crewmen from the badly damaged "escort" carrier, USS KITKUN BAY (CVE-71). More than two hundred carrier sailors owed their lives to DD-378. Months later, she would assist that badly damaged USS RENSHAW (DD- 499), suffering from torpedo damage. SMITH pulled alongside the stricken tin can, providing electrical power, pumping out the after engine room, and taking off RENSHAW's wounded. SMITH towed RENSHAW for six hours until temporary repairs could be made and better-equipped salvage forces were available. DD-499 survived.

By June 1945, USS SMITH was off Borneo, trading shots with Japanese shore batteries. Three well-placed shots went through the destroyer’s number one stack, but all were duds. Unfortunately for the Japanese, SMITH's fire was even more accurate, and her shells worked just fine. The shore batteries were silenced.

The announcement of cease-fire in the Pacific found the veteran destroyer in the waters around the Philippines. She would quickly transfer to the Japanese home islands to oversee the repatriation of American prisoners-of-war. DD-378 would finally return to the West Coast in November 1945, only to be ordered to Pearl Harbor for deactivation.

SMITH was decommissioned on June 28, 1946 and stricken from the Navy List on February 25, 1947.


Contents

Each episode of Battle 360 makes extensive use of veteran interviews from the sailors, pilots and Marines of USS Enterprise (CV-6). Many of these veterans' accounts appear as ongoing storylines throughout the series and the veterans themselves become regular characters. Among the veterans interviewed for the program are pilots Captain Donald "Flash" Gordon, Stanley "Swede" Vejtasa, Captain Norman "Dusty" Kleiss, Rear Admiral James D. Ramage, and Bruce McGraw. Among the ship's surviving crew interviewed for the series are Yeoman Willard Norberg, Roy E. Blood (1918–2015), Jack Glass, Arnold Olson and James Barnhill. Members of the ship's Marine Detachment are also interviewed including Louis Michot, Jack Maroney, Frank Graves, Richard Harte, Walter Keil and George E. Lanvermeier, Sr.

In addition to the Enterprise veterans, there are a number of veteran contributors from other vessels that fought with Enterprise, including sailors from USS Hornet (CV-8) , USS Northampton (CA-26) , USS North Carolina (BB-55) , and USS Smith (DD-378) .

The series consists of ten episodes. [6]

No. TitleOriginal air date
1"Call to Duty"February 29, 2008 ( 2008-02-29 )
The Attack on Pearl Harbor, the entry of the United States into World War II, the Marshall Islands Raid, and the Doolittle Raid.
2"Vengeance at Midway"March 7, 2008 ( 2008-03-07 )
The Battle of Midway.
3"Jaws of the Enemy"March 14, 2008 ( 2008-03-14 )
The Solomon Islands campaign and the beginning of the battle for Guadalcanal. Enterprise also receives a baptism of fire in the Battle of the Eastern Solomons.
4"Bloody Santa Cruz"March 21, 2008 ( 2008-03-21 )
The Solomon Islands campaign and the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands.
5"Enterprise versus Japan"March 28, 2008 ( 2008-03-28 )
Fighting in the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal as the only American aircraft carrier active in the Pacific theater of war.
6"The Grey Ghost"April 4, 2008 ( 2008-04-04 )
The refitting and repair of Enterprise, and the battle for the Gilbert Islands.
7"Hammer of Hell"April 11, 2008 ( 2008-04-11 )
Assaulting Truk Lagoon as part of Operation Hailstone, including the first night radar bombing attack from a U.S. carrier.
8"D-Day in the Pacific"April 18, 2008 ( 2008-04-18 )
The Battle of the Philippine Sea, the largest aircraft carrier battle in history, and Enterprise ' s participation in the Saipan Campaign.
9"Battle of Leyte Gulf"April 25, 2008 ( 2008-04-25 )
The Battle of Leyte Gulf, the largest naval battle of World War II, and the Philippines Campaign of 1944–1945.
10"The Empire's Last Stand"May 2, 2008 ( 2008-05-02 )
The battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, night sorties, attacks by kamikazes, the end of World War II, and the legacy of Enterprise.

Repeats of the series are currently airing on the digital broadcast network Quest. The show has also been rereleased on the Official YouTube Channel.


Reality Star and Spokesperson

In 2002, television viewers got an inside look at Smith and her wacky, quirky ways with a new series. The Anna Nicole Show, a reality program, followed her through her daily activities. At times, the show was difficult to watch as Smith seemed disoriented or confused, but the audience continued to tune in to see what Smith might do or say next. She was often shown in the company of Howard K. Stern, her attorney. While the show went off the air in 2004, Smith remained popular with the American public.

Having struggled with her weight on and off for years, Smith became a spokesperson for a line of diet products in 2003. She lost a significant amount of weight and did some modeling and acting. In 2006, Smith starred in the science fiction-comedy Illegal Aliens. Her son Daniel also worked on the project with her.


USS Smith DD-378 (1936-1947)

Request a FREE packet and get the best information and resources on mesothelioma delivered to you overnight.

All Content is copyright 2021 | About Us

Attorney Advertising. This website is sponsored by Seeger Weiss LLP with offices in New York, New Jersey and Philadelphia. The principal address and telephone number of the firm are 55 Challenger Road, Ridgefield Park, New Jersey, (973) 639-9100. The information on this website is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to provide specific legal or medical advice. Do not stop taking a prescribed medication without first consulting with your doctor. Discontinuing a prescribed medication without your doctor’s advice can result in injury or death. Prior results of Seeger Weiss LLP or its attorneys do not guarantee or predict a similar outcome with respect to any future matter. If you are a legal copyright holder and believe a page on this site falls outside the boundaries of "Fair Use" and infringes on your client’s copyright, we can be contacted regarding copyright matters at [email protected]


JACKSON W. PARKER, ENS, USN

After hearing Jack sing in the shower, one could easily guess that he came from the deepest South. From the land of the magnolias, he came to the academy to become a naval officer instead of a brick manufacturer. During those numerous free periods, you could always find Jack somewhere making a five bid out of a possible four. His favorite pastimes were bridge, handball, swimming, and reading. There was always time in his schedule for plenty of fun and a good time. Jack is constant and sure in his duties. In the race with the Academic departments, he barely missed obtaining those coveted stars.

The Class of 1943 was graduated in June 1942 due to World War II. The entirety of 2nd class (junior) year was removed from the curriculum.

JACKSON WELCH PARKER

After hearing Jack sing in the shower, one could easily guess that he came from the deepest South. From the land of the magnolias, he came to the academy to become a naval officer instead of a brick manufacturer. During those numerous free periods, you could always find Jack somewhere making a five bid out of a possible four. His favorite pastimes were bridge, handball, swimming, and reading. There was always time in his schedule for plenty of fun and a good time. Jack is constant and sure in his duties. In the race with the Academic departments, he barely missed obtaining those coveted stars.

The Class of 1943 was graduated in June 1942 due to World War II. The entirety of 2nd class (junior) year was removed from the curriculum.

Jack was one of 57 men lost aboard USS Smith (DD 378) on October 26, 1942 when the ship was heavily damaged by attacking aircraft while screening USS Enterprise (CV 6) and USS Hornet (CV 8).

The ship was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation for her action that day.

From the Class of 1943 anniversary book "25 years later…":

Jack was born on 13 April, 1921 in Bonita, Mississippi. He was appointed from Mississippi and entered the Academy on 28 June, 1939. After graduation he reported to the destroyer USS SMITH in combat in the South Pacific. During the Battle of Santa Cruz on 26 October, 1942, the SMITH was defending the carrier ENTERPRISE against a wave of Japanese Torpedo Planes when one of the aircraft, torpedo and all, flung itself into the SMITH’s forecastle which erupted into a shower of flame. The SMITH was saved but with the loss of many lives including Jack's. He wore the Purple Heart, the American Defense Service Medal with Fleet Clasp, the Asiatic-Pacific Area Campaign, and the Presidential Unit Citation earned during the day Jack was killed. He was survived by his mother, Mrs. Mary Octabia Parker who at Jack's death resided in Bonita, Mississippi.


Mục lục

Smith được đặt lườn vào ngày 27 tháng 10 năm 1934 tại Xưởng hải quân Mare Island ở Mare Island, California. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 20 tháng 2 năm 1936, được đỡ đầu bởi bà Yancey S. Williams và được đưa ra hoạt động vào ngày 19 tháng 9 năm 1936 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Trung tá Hải quân H. L. Grosskopf.

1941-1942 Sửa đổi

Sau khi nhập biên chế, Smith tuần tra tại vùng biển dọc bờ Tây Hoa Kỳ trong năm năm tiếp theo sau. Khi Hải quân Nhật bất ngờ tấn công Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 7 tháng 12 năm 1941, nó đang ở tại San Francisco, California trong thành phần Hải đội Khu trục 5, và cho đến tháng 4 năm 1942 đã làm nhiệm vụ hộ tống các đoàn tàu vận tải đi lại giữa vùng bờ Tây và Trân Châu Cảng.

Vào ngày 7 tháng 4, Smith được phân về Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 1, vốn bao gồm Đội thiết giáp hạm 3, và thực hành huấn luyện tại vùng bờ Tây cho đến khi khởi hành đi Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 1 tháng 6. Sau khi đến nơi, nó được phân về Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 17 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Phó đô đốc Marc Mitscher, tham gia tuần tra và huấn luyện trong một tháng, rồi hộ tống một đoàn tàu quay trở lại San Francisco. Sau khi được đại tu và chạy thử máy tại khu vực vịnh San Francisco, nó quay trở lại Trân Châu Cảng vào giữa tháng 8, bắt đầu một giai đoạn bảo trì và huấn luyện. Đến ngày 15 tháng 10, nó được phân về Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 16, bao gồm tàu sân bay USS Enterprise và thiết giáp hạm USS South Dakota đơn vị này rời Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 16 tháng 10 để tuần tra tác chiến, có thêm các tàu tuần dương USS Portland và USS San Juan cùng các tàu khu trục hộ tống gia nhập vào lực lượng trong tuần tiếp theo.

Lực lượng đặc nhiệm hoạt động về phía Tây Bắc quần đảo New Hebrides, khi vào ngày 24 tháng 10, họ phát hiện một lực lượng tàu sân bay Nhật Bản đang tập trung về phía Guadalcanal. Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 17, tàu sân bay USS Hornet và lực lượng tuần dương-khu trục hộ tống cho nó đã gia nhập cùng Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 16, và lực lượng kết hợp được đặt tên Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 61. Đến ngày 26 tháng 10, máy bay trinh sát của Enterprise phát hiện hạm đội Nhật Bản. Lúc 09 giờ 44 phút, trông thấy chiếc máy bay Nhật Bản đầu tiên, và Hornet bị trúng bom 30 phút sau đó. Lúc 11 giờ 25 phút, Smith bị một đội hình 20 máy bay ném bom-ngư lôi tấn công hai mươi phút sau, một máy bay ném bom-ngư lôi Nhật đâm trúng sàn trước, gây một vụ nổ lớn.

Căn cứ theo một nguồn, quả ngư lôi chiếc máy bay mang theo đã không phát nổ ngay khi va chạm, nhưng kích nổ một lúc sau đó, khiến gây thêm những thiệt hại và thương vong. [4] Phần phía trước con tàu chìm ngập trong khói lửa của các thùng xăng bị vỡ và phải bỏ cầu tàu toàn bộ phần trước con tàu trước tháp pháo 1 phải bị bỏ. Dù vậy, xạ thủ của Smith đã bắn rơi sáu máy bay đối phương. Đến xế trưa, mọi đám cháy được dập lửa, chủ yếu nhờ quyết định của Hạm trưởng bẻ lái con tàu đang cháy theo sau USS South Dakota. [1] Với 57 người thiệt mạng hay mất tích, 12 người bị thương, hầm đạn bị làm ngập nước và tạm thời không thể vận hành bánh lái từ cầu tàu, chiến sự kết thúc lúc chiều tối, và chiếc tàu khu trục hướng đến Nouméa để sửa chữa tạm thời. Nó được vá các lỗ thủng, và lên đường đi Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 5 tháng 11. Công việc sửa chữa, đại tu và chạy thử máy kéo dài cho đến tháng 2 năm 1943.

Smith được tặng thưởng danh hiệu Đơn vị Tuyên dương Tổng thống do đã tiếp tục chiến đấu bất chấp những hư hại của con tàu.

1943 Sửa đổi

Smith khởi hành vào ngày 12 tháng 2 năm 1943 để đi Espiritu Santo trong vai trò hộ tống cho chiếc USS Wright. USS Gridley gia nhập lực lượng hộ tống tại đây, và các con tàu tiếp tục đi đến Guadalcanal, nơi Smith thực hiện tuần tra chống tàu ngầm cho đến ngày 12 tháng 3. Nó sau đó quay trở lại Espiritu Santo, tham gia nhiều cuộc tuần tra, thực tập chiến thuật và tiếp liệu cùng Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 10 tại khu vực New Caledonia-biển Coral cho đến ngày 28 tháng 4. Nó quay trở về Trân Chuâ Cảng trong tháng tiếp theo để được tiếp liệu, rồi lên đường đi Australia.

Smith được phối thuộc cùng Đội khu trục 5, và thực tập tại khu vực Townsville-mũi Moreton cho đến ngày 10 tháng 6, khi nó hộ tống các tàu buôn và tàu đổ bộ đi đến vịnh Milne và ở lại đây cho đến hết tháng 7. Nó khởi hành đi Mackay, Australia, và vào xưởng tàu để sửa chữa vào ngày 1 tháng 8. Sau khi công việc hoàn tất, nó quay trở lại vịnh Milne, tiếp tục thực hành và chuẩn bị cho các chiến dịch sắp tới cùng Đệ Thất hạm đội.

Cùng các tàu khu trục USS Perkins, USS Conyngham và USS Mahan, Smith đã bắn phá Finschhafen, New Guinea vào ngày 23 tháng 8 mà không bị kháng cự. Hải đội quay trở về vịnh Milne tham gia các cuộc thực hành cho đến ngày 2 tháng 9, khi nó lên đường cùng Đội đặc nhiệm 76 để đi đến khu vực vịnh Huon thuộc New Guinea. Smith đã bắn phá các mục tiêu trong khu vực được phân công tại bãi Red trước cuộc đổ bộ của Sư đoàn 9 Bộ binh Australia vào ngày 4 tháng 9. Nó tiếp tục ở lại khu vực cho các cuộc càn quét tấn công, tuần tra chống tàu ngầm và phòng không cho đến ngày 18 tháng 9. Trong đêm 7-8 tháng 9, hải đội đã bắn phá Lae.

Trong giai đoạn từ ngày 20 đến ngày 23 tháng 9, Smith tham gia các hoạt động bắn phá và hỗ trợ đổ bộ tại Finschhafen như một đơn vị của Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 76. Các cuộc không kích của đối phương được tung ra nhắm vào lực lượng đặc nhiệm nhưng không gây thiệt hại gì ngược lại đối phương bị mất máy bay bởi hỏa lực phòng không và máy bay tuần tra chiến đấu. Nó sau đó quay trở lại vịnh Holnicote cho các hoạt động tiếp tế đến Lae và Finschhafen. Vào ngày 3 tháng 10, Smith, USS Henley và USS Reid được phân công nhiệm vụ quét mìn tại vịnh Huon. Lúc 18 giờ 21 phút, trinh sát viên phát hiện ba đợt sóng ngư lôi bên mạn phải, con tàu bẻ hết lái qua phải và luồn qua giữa hai quả ngư lôi, một cách 500 thước Anh (460 m) bên mạn trái và một cách 200 thước Anh (180 m) bên mạn phải. Henley trúng một quả ngư lôi bên mạn trái, và sáu phút sau nó bị vỡ làm đôi và biến mất lúc 18 giờ 32 phút. Smith tiến hành tấn công bằng mìn sâu nhưng không mang lại kết quả. Hải đội tiếp tục trải qua thời gian còn lại của tháng trong các nhiệm vụ tiếp tế đến các cứ điểm tiền phương. Smith có một đợt nghỉ ngơi bảo trì ngắn tại vịnh Milne vào đầu tháng 11 trước khi quay trở lại khu vực Lae-Finschhafen.

Vào ngày 14 tháng 12, Smith được điều động về lực lượng tấn công Arawe được hình thành tại vịnh Holnicote, và khởi hành cho chiến dịch này. Sáng hôm sau, nó bắn phá "bãi Orange" tại mũi Merkus, và hỗ trợ các hoạt động tiếp theo cùng các đơn vị khác thuộc Đội khu trục 5. Hải đội sau đó quay trở về vịnh Milne để chuẩn bị cho việc tấn công chiếm mũi Gloucester, New Britain. Nó khởi hành từ Buna vào ngày 25 tháng 12 trong thành phần hộ tống cho Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 76, và như một đơn vị thuộc lực lượng bắn phá. Sáng hôm sau, nó bắn phá "bãi Green" thuộc mũi Gloucester nhằm chuẩn bị cho cuộc đổ bộ của Sư đoàn 1 Thủy quân Lục chiến. Nó hộ tống cho các tàu vận tải tiếp liệu đi đến khu vực đổ bộ trong tuần lễ tiếp theo.

1944 Sửa đổi

Smith là một đơn vị thuộc Lực lượng Tấn công Saidor, khi vào ngày 1 tháng 1 năm 1944, nó bị chiếc USS Hutchins đâm vào phía đuôi tàu, buộc phải quay trở lại vịnh Milne để sửa chữa. Không lâu sau đó, nó gia nhập trở lại hải đội cho các hoạt động tiếp liệu đến khu vực mũi Gloucester và Lae. Nó đã bắn phá các vị trí cố thủ tại vùng phụ cận Herwath Point và Singor vào ngày 13 tháng 2 nhằm chuẩn bị cho cuộc đổ bộ tại đây. Đến ngày 28 tháng 2, nó khởi hành từ mũi Sudest như một đơn vị thuộc lực lượng tấn công quần đảo Admiralty, với 71 sĩ quan và binh lính thuộc Sư đoàn Kỵ binh 1 trên tàu để đổ bộ họ xuống đảo Los Negros. Vào ngày 29 tháng 2, nó bắt đầu bắn phá các mục tiêu được chỉ định dọc bờ biển phía Bắc của cảng Hyane. Lực lượng kỵ binh được đổ bộ, và chiếc tàu khu trục bắn hỏa lực hỗ trợ theo yêu cầu cho đến chiều tối, khi nó chuyển thêm binh lính xuống khu vực đổ bộ.

Vào ngày 17 tháng 3, Smith cùng với Hải đội Khu trục 5 rời khu vực Nam Thái Bình Dương quay trở về San Francisco ngang qua Trân Châu Cảng. Giai đoạn đại tu tại đây hoàn tất vào ngày 21 tháng 6, và hải đội lên đường đi Trân Châu Cảng, trải qua năm tuần lễ tại đây thực hành huấn luyện và thực tập tác xạ. Vào ngày 1 tháng 8, chiếc tàu khu trục được lệnh đi đến Eniwetok và tuần tra tại khu vực quần đảo Marshall vẫn còn do đối phương chiếm đóng cho đến ngày 24 tháng 9, khi nó gia nhập Đội đặc nhiệm 57.9, bao gồm Đội tuần dương 5, và khởi hành đi Saipan. Đội đặc nhiệm bắt đầu các cuộc tuần tra tấn công khu vực phía Bắc để bảo vệ tiền đồn tại khu vực Trung tâm Thái Bình Dương này khỏi các cuộc tấn công của đối phương. Smith quay trở về Eniwetok vào đầu tháng 10, thực hiến một chuyến đi hộ tống đến Ulithi, rồi lên đường đi Hollandia.

Smith được phối thuộc cùng Đệ Thất hạm đội vào ngày 26 tháng 10, và lên đường vào ngày hôm sau để đi vịnh Leyte, đi đến San Pedro ba ngày sau đó. Nó tuần tra tại vịnh Leyte như một đơn vị thuộc Đội đặc nhiệm 77.1 từ ngày 1 đến ngày 16 tháng 11, trước khi hộ tống một đoàn tàu đi New Georgia và quay trở về. Nó được lệnh gặp gỡ Lực lượng Tấn công Ormoc vào ngày 6 tháng 12 để bắn phá các vị trí đối phương trên bờ, rồi cho đổ bộ Sư đoàn Bộ binh 77 tại đây. Đội đặc nhiệm đi đến vịnh Ormoc vào sáng hôm sau, nơi Smith được bố trí về phía Đông Bắc đảo Ponson như một tàu dẫn đường máy bay chiến đấu. Lúc 09 giờ 45 phút, máy bay Nhật Bản tấn công hạm đội. Ít nhất ba máy bay cảm tử đối phương đã bổ nhào lên USS Mahan và ba chiếc khác lên USS Aaron Ward cà hai đều bị hư hại nặng và sau đó bị đánh chìm bởi hỏa lực bạn sau khi rõ ràng các đám cháy của chúng không thể kiểm soát được và không thể cứu vớt. Các cuộc không kích tiếp tục diễn ra suốt buổi sáng, và khi lực lượng được đổ bộ lên bờ, đội tấn công rút lui về Leyte.

Smith cùng với Hải đội Khu trục 5 rời San Pedro cùng một đội tiếp liệu vào ngày 11 tháng 12 để đi vịnh Ormoc, họ bị máy bay đối phương tấn công vào chiều tối hôm đó tại vịnh Leyte. Lúc 17 giờ 04 phút, Reid bị đánh trúng một quả bom và một máy bay tự sát và sau một vụ nổ dữ dội, nó lật úp và đắm lúc 17giờ 06 phút. Smith đã bắn rơi bốn máy bay đối phương. Sáng hôm sau, đội hình lại bị máy bay Nhật tấn công, khi USS Caldwell bị một máy bay kamikaze đánh trúng khiến nó bốc cháy. Không có cú đánh trúng nào khác vào các tàu khu trục, và Smith tiếp tục nhiệm vụ tiếp liệu cho đến ngày 17 tháng 12, khi nó lên đường đi Manus để tiếp liệu và bảo trì.

1945 Sửa đổi

Smith quay trở lại vịnh Leyte vào ngày 6 tháng 1 năm 1945 trong thành phần Đội đặc nhiệm 79.2, làm nhiệm vụ hỗ trợ cho các cuộc đổ bộ tại vịnh Lingayen, Luzon. Một cuộc không kích nặng nề diễn ra hai ngày sau đó, khi tàu sân bay hộ tống USS Kitkun Bay bị hư hại nặng bởi một chiếc kamikaze. Smith, ở cách đó 3.000 thước Anh (2.700 m), đã túc trực để cứu những người sống sót nó đưa lên tàu khoảng 200 thủy thủ. Vào ngày 9 tháng 1, nó đã có thể đưa những người này quay trở lại Kitkun Bay, sau khi chiếc tàu sân bay đã có thể di chuyển bằng chính động lực của mình. Smith sau đó được giao nhiệm vụ tuần tra khu vực phía Bắc vịnh Lingayen. Từ ngày 28 tháng 1 đến ngày 20 tháng 2, nó hộ tống các đoàn tàu vận tải đi đến Hollandia, Sansapor và Leyte. Tại Leyte vào ngày 20 tháng 2, nó được giao hộ tống một đoàn tàu vận tải đi vịnh Mangarin, Mindoro. Đang khi băng qua biển Mindanao vào sáng hôm sau, tàu khu trục USS Renshaw bị đánh trúng một quả ngư lôi và bị hư hại nặng. Smith đã cặp bên mạn để chuyển những người bị thương, cung cấp điện và giúp bơm nước ra khỏi phòng động cơ phía sau bị ngập. Nó đã kéo Renshaw trong sáu giờ trước khi nó được cứu hộ, di chuyển độc lập đến San Pedro và chuyển những người bị thương đã đón lên tàu.

Trên đường đi Mindoro vào ngày 24 tháng 2, Smith bắt được một tín hiệu radar vốn không trả lời yêu cầu nhận diện và khi đối tượng được chiếu sáng, nó được phát hiện là một tàu hơi nước Nhật tải trọng 200 tấn. Mục tiêu bị bắn cháy lúc 21 giờ 47 phút và bị tiêu diệt lúc 21 giờ 58 phút. Smith khởi hành từ Mindoro vào ngày 26 tháng 2 như Đội đặc nhiệm 78.2, một đơn vị thuộc Lực lượng Tấn công Puerta Princesa, Palawan. Nó trực chiến hai ngày sau đó, và đến 08 giờ 18 phút đã bắt đầu bắn pháo chuẩn bị lên các cứ điểm trên bờ tại "bãi White". Nó sau đó tuần tra lối ra vào cảng Palawan cho đến ngày 4 tháng 3 nó được thay phiên trong nhiệm vụ tuần tra, và thực hiện hai chuyến đi đến Palawan hộ tống các tàu tiếp liệu.

Vào ngày 24 tháng 3, Smith lại lên đường cùng Đội đặc nhiệm 78.2, lần này mục tiêu là vận chuyển và đổ bộ Sư đoàn 1 Bộ binh đến thành phố Cebu, đảo Cebu. Nó đã bắn phá các bãi đổ bộ vào sáng ngày tấn công 28 tháng 3, và sau khi lực lượng đổ bộ đã bắn pháo hỗ trợ theo yêu cầu. Trong khoảng thời gian 18 ngày, nó đã tiêu phí 1.200 quả đạn pháo 5 inch (130 mm). Vào ngày 23 tháng 4, nó rời Philippines với mệnh lệnh gia nhập Đội đặc nhiệm 78.1 tại Morotai.

Đội đặc nhiệm rời Morotai vào ngày 27 tháng 4, đưa Lữ đoàn Bộ binh 26 Australia đi đến đảo Tarakan, Borneo, cho một cuộc đổ bộ. Smith bắt đầu việc bắn phá chuẩn bị lên bãi đổ bộ lúc 07 giờ 00 ngày 1 tháng 5, và tiếp tục ở lại khu vực này cho đến ngày 19 tháng 5, hoạt động trong vai trò bắn pháo hỗ trợ, bảo vệ và tuần tra lối ra vào cảng. Nó rút lui về Morotai trước khi lên đường đi Zamboanga, gặp gỡ chiếc USS Mettawee và hộ tống nó quay trở lại Tarakan. Sau đó nó bắn pháo hỗ trợ ban đêm cho binh lính Australia trước khi được lệnh quay trở lại Morotai.

Tại đây, Smith được phối thuộc cùng Đội đặc nhiệm 78.2 dưới quyền Chuẩn đô đốc Arthur G. Noble vào ngày 26 tháng 6, rồi lại lên đường đi Borneo. Lần này mục tiêu của nó là Balikpapan, nơi Quân đoàn 1 Australia sẽ được đổ bộ. Nó bắt đầu việc bắn phá chuẩn bị lúc 07 giờ 00 ngày 1 tháng 7, bị pháo phòng thủ duyên hải đối phương trên bờ bắn trả với những phát suýt trúng. Cuối cùng ba quả đạn pháo đối phương cũng bắn trúng ống khói, nhưng không phát nổ, và chỉ gây những hư hại nhẹ. Một vị trí pháo đối phương được thấy trên bờ bị hỏa lực bắn trả tiêu diệt. Con tàu rời khu vực vào ngày hôm sau để quay về Morotai, đón một đoàn tàu vận tải tiếp liệu và đưa chúng đến Balikpapan vào ngày 16 tháng 7. Nó rời khu vực chiến trường vào ngày 24 tháng 7, quay trở về San Pedro để bảo trì.

Smith khởi hành từ Philippine vào ngày 15 tháng 8 để đi vịnh Buckner ở lại đây trong hai tuần trước khi lên đường đi đến cảng Nagasaki, Kyūshū. Vào ngày 15 tháng 9, nó đón lên tàu 90 cựu tù binh chiến tranh, và sang sáng hôm sau lại khởi hành đi Okinawa để chuyển họ quay trở về Hoa Kỳ. Nó đón thêm 90 cựu tù binh Đồng Minh khác tại Nagasaki vào ngày 21 tháng 9 và chuyển họ sang chiếc USS Renville trong vịnh Buckner. Nó đi đến Sasebo vào ngày 28 tháng 9, và lên đường hai ngày sau đó để quay về San Diego ngang qua Trân Châu Cảng. Nó neo đậu tại San Diego vào ngày 19 tháng 11, và tiếp tục ở lại đây cho đến khi được lệnh đi Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 28 tháng 12 chờ đợi mệnh lệnh mới. Nó đi đến Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 3 tháng 1 năm 1946 ở trong tình trạng không hoạt động cho đến khi được cho xuất biên chế vào ngày 28 tháng 6 năm 1946. Tên nó được cho rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 25 tháng 2 năm 1947, và nó bị bán để tháo dỡ trong tháng 8 năm đó.

Smith được tặng thưởng danh hiệu Đơn vị Tuyên dương Tổng thống cùng sáu Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Chiến tranh Thế giới thứ hai.


  • General Records Schedules
  • Records Management Liaison Officers
  • Forms and Publications
  • Records Management Training
  • Dispose of Public Records
  • State Records Center
  • About Records Management
  • Florida Statutes and Rules
  • Disaster Recovery
  • Records Management FAQ
  • Related Links

Many of these resources and programs are funded under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Florida's LSTA program is administered by the Department of State's Division of Library and Information Services.

Ron DeSantis, Governor
Laurel M. Lee, Secretary of State

Under Florida law, e-mail addresses are public records. If you do not want your e-mail address released in response to a public records request, do not send electronic mail to this entity. Instead, contact this office by phone or in writing.

Copyright © 2021 State of Florida, Florida Department of State.


Navy Directories & Officer Registers

The "Register of Commissioned and Warrant Officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps" was published annually from 1815 through at least the 1970s it provided rank, command or station, and occasionally billet until the beginning of World War II when command/station was no longer included. Scanned copies were reviewed and data entered from the mid-1840s through 1922, when more-frequent Navy Directories were available.

The Navy Directory was a publication that provided information on the command, billet, and rank of every active and retired naval officer. Single editions have been found online from January 1915 and March 1918, and then from three to six editions per year from 1923 through 1940 the final edition is from April 1941.

The entries in both series of documents are sometimes cryptic and confusing. They are often inconsistent, even within an edition, with the name of commands this is especially true for aviation squadrons in the 1920s and early 1930s.

Alumni listed at the same command may or may not have had significant interactions they could have shared a stateroom or workspace, stood many hours of watch together… or, especially at the larger commands, they might not have known each other at all. The information provides the opportunity to draw connections that are otherwise invisible, though, and gives a fuller view of the professional experiences of these alumni in Memorial Hall.